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Bebop Spoken There

David Binney: "In this age, we musicians need to do anything we can to make a living, and ninety-nine percent of us will have to do a wide variety of things." - (Jazz Times May 2019)

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Until July 21

Today Tuesday July 16

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden. See above.

Classic Swing - The Ship Inn, Front Street, Monkseaton NE25 8DP. 0191 251 3677. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

Jazz

Gala Big Band w. ALAN BARNES: Strictly Come BRASSing - Gala Theatre, Millennium Place, Durham DH1 1WA. Tel: 03000 266 600. 7:30pm. £15.00. (£12.00. concs.). A Durham Brass Festival event.

River City Jazzmen - Block & Tackle, Blackthorn Way, Ashington NE63 8NW. Tel: 01670 813983 (info). 8:00pm. £5.00. (inc. raffle). RCJ with Don Armstrong (clarinet, saxophone, penny whistle, vocals).

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SOLD OUT!

Zoe Rahman & Laura MacDonald - Lit & Phil, Westgate Road, Newcastle NE1 1SE. Tel: 0191 232 0192.. 8:00pm. £12.00. (£10.00. concs.). JNE.

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Northern Monkey Brass Band - Fox Inn, West End Terrace, Hexham NE46 3DB.Tel: 01434 603681. 8:30pm. Free (donations).

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

CD Review: Quinsin Nachoff’s Flux - Path of Totality.

(Review by Dave Brownlow.)

A double CD featuring the work of a musician whose compositions and playing lie in the spaces between genres and styles, where jazz and classical music ‘meld’ together in the avant-garde. Take as the starting point - say from classical, Stockhausen, John Cage or Philip Glass and from jazz, Sun Ra, Cecil Taylor or Derek Bailey and then go forward from there! The Band, “FLUX” comprises two saxes, one keyboard, two drummers/percussionists but no bass or bass guitar. Nine other players are involved among the recordings where they use conventional instruments or the vast array of vintage electro-acoustic instruments provided by Canada's National Music Centre’s extensive keyboard collection to provide constantly surprising musical environments. There are six tracks, all of which require aural stamina as they range from 6, 13, 14, and 19 minutes in length!


Path of Totality was inspired by the 2017 eclipse of the sun. A “way-out” theme leads to solos from the saxophones in contemporary/freestyle backed by outrageous chords from Mitchell and rock- steady interplay from the two drummers.

The 19-minute Bounce, built on the mathematical model of a bouncing ball, features drummer Wood challenging Binney at every phrase; then a calmer phase using ‘radio signals from outer space’. This is followed by an “other-worldly” keyboard interlude which segues into the finale introducing the 1924 Kimball Theatre Organ. This instrument produces a huge, dramatic wall of chordal sound in a beautiful requiem to Kenny Wheeler and John Taylor. Some track this….!

The 19-minute John Cage-inspired Toy-Piano Meditation incorporates Mark Duggan on marimba, vibes, glockenspiel, crotales and Tibetan singing bowls. Out-of-tempo at times, stately rubato at others, floating gently, searching, the C-Melody sax eventually takes it to its conclusion.

Marche Macabre is all doomy discord and bleak humour where the ‘march machine’- a wooden board fitted with a row of clomping clogs- provides the “Brave New World” conflict basis. Weird, outlandish segments of music follow with occasional interjections from brass and reed sections adding to the taste of disquiet and disharmony. The terrible mood is finally broken by a tap-dance from Orlando Hernandez which dissipates the ‘totalitarian’ chaos in a welcome diversion…

On Splatter, David Travis-Smith is let loose with his array of keyboard and electronic devices in a stunning, abstract, erratic, frantic, discordant soundscape – a “Jackson Pollock” of melody and percussion.

Orbital Resonances is “based on the intersecting pathways of orbiting bodies in space”. Strongly rhythmic, with the two drummers well in the foreground, this is a riot of seemingly unconnected melodic statements in a very experimental format.

There are moments of great beauty in this music which goes beyond all the boundaries of conventional forms. Experimental styles are the norm, borders are freely crossed, arts and sciences, astronomy and physics provide the inspirations for these extraordinary, thought-provoking compositions and solos.
Dave B

The album is available now on Whirlwind Recordings WR4733 from: www.quinsin.com

David Binney (alto & C-Melody saxes); Quinsin Nachoff (tenor & soprano saxes); Matt Mitchell (piano, Prophet 6 modular synth, Novachord, harpsichord, Estey pump harmonium,); Kenny Wollesen (drums & Wollesen Percussion #1 #3 #4 #6)) Nate Wood (drums #1 #2 #5 #6)
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Bounce: Jason Barnsley (1924 Kimball Theatre Organ).

Toy Piano Meditation: Mark Duggan (marimba, vibes, glockenspiel, crotales, Tibetan singing bowls).

Marche Macabre: Carl Maraghi (baritone sax & bass clarinet), Dan Urness & Matt Holman (trumpets), Ryan Keberle, Alan Ferber (trombones), Orlando Hernandez (tap-dance),

Splatter: David Travers-Smith (Buchla 200E Analog Modular System, EMS Synthi 100 Analog/Digital Hybrid Synthesizer, Arp Chroma (Rhodes) Analog Synthesizer, Clavioline, Oberhelm SEM Modular Moog).

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance