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Bebop Spoken There

Ethan Iverson: "Mickey Roker played drums in church, and his beat on [Mary Lou] Williams' "Ode to St. Cecile" might make even a diehard atheist a believer" - (JazzTimes Sept. 2019).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Monday October 14

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see above).

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Evening

Richard Bona & Alfredo Rodriguez - Sage Gateshead, St Mary’s Square, Gateshead Quays, Gateshead NE8 2JR. Tel: 0191 443 4661. 8:00pm. £24.50.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Sunday, January 27, 2019

Tigran Hamasyan and The Voices of Hope @ Sage Gateshead – Jan. 26

Tigran Hamasyan (piano, synthesizer); Voices of Hope (vocals)
(Review by Ann Alex)
I didn’t know what to expect from this original music, which was billed as music with various elements and a choir. It began with the artist referred to simply as ‘Tigran’, smartly dressed in white shirt and grey waistcoat, playing what sounded like a piano sonata, but then jazz-like chords popped up, yet the basic motif of the melody wasn’t lost. So it continued, each piece of music lasting about 5 minutes. The first piece had classical elements, the second was jazzier and the third was based on a folk-like melody, rather eastern in sound, with Tigran humming to parts of the tune. I’d guess that this was music played freely without bar lines.  By about the fourth piece, the synthesizer was involved, with layers of sounds, beats, hums, airy noise, whistles, giving a pleasing cascade. Perhaps this was what Beethoven would have sounded like if he’d had 21st-century technology.

Tigran named only 2 of the pieces, possibly because his knowledge of English seemed to be limited. I didn’t catch one of the names but the other piece was entitled Revolving, which was an appropriate description, as it swirled and circled well, although I thought it went on for rather a long time. Then on came the choir, 5 women and 4 men, all dressed in black and wearing trousers. They sang a couple of beautiful melodies in harmony, the sort that are sung in the Russian Orthodox Church. They were probably Armenian tunes, as that is where Tigran hails from. He meanwhile played the piano, not actual accompaniment, but riffs and melodies which fitted the singing yet also worked as a counterpoint to the choral work. Tigran’s habit of putting his face down close to the keyboard at times is reminiscent of Bill Evans’ style of playing, I was told.

The audience, which filled level one of the hall and some seats on level two, demanded an encore, during which all stops were out, literally, with many synthesizer sounds, passionate piano, humming, whistling. Tigran then left the music to play by itself on the stage for a couple of minutes before returning for his applause. I thought this piece was a bit overdone and I had enjoyed the shorter items towards the beginning of the performance more.

All told, an interesting evening of music which was enjoyable. Tigran has performed in Manchester, Dublin and Oxford, and is due at Celtic Connections in Glasgow today (Jan. 27)
Ann Alex  

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance