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Bebop Spoken There

Freddie Gavita: "I first got into pedals when playing with Mark Fletcher's outfit Fletch's Brew. I felt with the line up I needed a bit of help" - (Jazzwise April, 2020).

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COVID-19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Sunday, April 08, 2018

GIJF Day 2: Ruby Turner - Sage Gateshead, April 7

Ruby Turner (vocal); Jason Thompson (keys); Nick Marland (guitar); Paul Pryor (bass guitar); Simon Moore (drums).
(Review by Lance/Photo courtesy of Ken Drew).
With or without Jools Holland, Ruby Turner is a ball of fire just waiting to be ignited. Although tonight was without Jools, his presence wasn't missed and the blue touchpaper was lit from bar one of I'm Not the One. This lady hoots and hollers, shouts and sings, like few soul sisters (or brothers) either side of the Atlantic.
I didn't get the names of all the songs and many of the titles I did get were, in the cold light of morning, meaningless (try writing in the dark and you'll know what I mean).
Songs I did decipher/recognise were: Master Plan; Still on my Mind; There is Something on Your Mind and of course, the showstopping Etta James classic I'd Rather Go Blind. This brought the audience to their feet for the inevitable standing ovation she deserved and the raunchy encore the audience demanded.
Throughout, guitarist Marland took a host of solos that kept the flame burning, a flame that never flickered when keyboard ace Thompson took it up nor when bassman Pryor who also seemed to be controlling things had his place in the sun (the lighting, incidentally, wasn't always perfect and Ruby had to request adjustments as the night unfolded) whilst Simon Moore on kit excelled. At a jazz festival, top-notch drum solos are the norm and this was the norm plus!
A session full of soul and an indication of how blurred the lines have become 'twixt music's many genres.

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