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Bebop Spoken There

Joe Farnsworth: "I have to say that jazz in New York will never die. It may seem like all the music happened 3,000 years ago, but, Charlie Parker, Billy Higgins, Max Roach and all the others are still here. You can feel their presence."- (DownBeat, January 2022)

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.
Ann Braithwaite (Braithwaite & Katz Communications) You’re the BEST! --

Postage

13862 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 13 years ago. 81 of them this year alone and, so far, 81 this month (Jan. 25).

From This Moment On ...

January 2022

Tue 25: East Coast Swing Band @ East Bedlington Community Centre. 10:00am - 12 noon. Rehearsal session (open to the public) .
Tue 25: Jam session @ Black Swan, Newcastle. 7:30pm. House trio: Murray Wankling, Paul Grainger, King David Ike-Elechi.

Wed 26: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.
Wed 26: Classic Swing @ Venue, Cramlington NE23 6UT. 1:00pm.
Wed 26: Darlington Big Band @ Darlington & Simpson Rolling Mills Club, Darlington. 7:00pm. Rehearsal session (open to the public). CANCELLED!
Wed 26: Four @ The Exchange, North Shields. 7:00pm .
Wed 26: Take it to the Bridge @ The Globe, Newcastle. 7:30pm.

Thu 27: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ The Holystone, North Tyneside. 1:00pm.
Thu 27: Tobias Sarra & John Garner @ Cobalt Studios, Newcastle. 7:00pm .
Thu 27: 58 Jazz Collective @ Hops & Cheese, Hartlepool. 7:30pm.
Thu 27: Knats’ Night: Knats + Swannek @ Hoochie Coochie, Newcastle. 8:30pm. Free.
Thu 27: Maine Street Jazzmen @ Sunniside Social Club, Gateshead. 8:30pm. CANCELLED! .
Thu 27: Tees Hot Club @ Dorman's Club, Middlesbrough. 9:00pm.

Fri 28: Classic Swing @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.
Fri 28: New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band @ Oxbridge Hotel, Stockton. 1:00pm.
Fri 28: Rendezvous Jazz @ The Monkseaton Arms, Monkseaton. 1:00pm.
Fri 28: Ian Millar & Dominic Spencer @ Bishop Middleham Village Hall, Ferryhill. 8:00pm. £10.00.
Fri 28: Struggle Buggy @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm. Blues band.

Sat 29: Lindsay Hannon & Martin Douglas @ Cobalt Studios, Newcastle. 2:00pm. Life Drawing & Live Music. Enrol at: www.cobaltstudios.co.uk.

Sun 30 Vieux Carré Hot 4 @ Spanish City, Whitley Bay. 12 noon.
Sun 30: Musicians Unlimited @ South Durham Social Club, Hartlepool. 1:00pm.
Sun 30: Foundry Jazz Ensemble @ The Exchange, North Shields. 3:00pm.
Sun 30: Hot Club du Nord @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm. £10.00 adv., £12.00. door.

Mon 31: Jazz in the Afternoon @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.

February 2022

Tue 01: East Coast Swing Band @ East Bedlington Community Centre. 10:00am - 12 noon. Rehearsal session (open to the public).

Monday, February 27, 2017

CD Review - sort of - Tim Armacost: Time Being.

Tim Armacost (tenor); David Kikoski (piano); Robert Hurst (bass); Jeff' Tain' Watts (drums).
(Review by Lance).
My kind of tenor playing! My kind of jazz! Armacost is one of those blowing guys that catch your attention from chorus one. He's Blue Note, Prestige, Riverside - those labels would have reached out to him way back when.
To be honest, I didn't quite follow the blurb and it made me think I was cheating by just listening and enjoying!
Then I did think about it and played a Hank Mobley CD.
I Stopped thinking.
(Blurb)
The beginnings of this debut Whirlwind release as leader, from acclaimed Los Angeles-born tenor saxophonist Tim Armacost, tell a fascinating tale. A marquee player on the New York and Japanese scenes for many years, with an extensive discography and countless live and recorded collaborations to his name in the US, Europe and Asia (including the New York Standards Quartet recordings on this label), the clear direction for Time Being arrived, remarkably, out of the blue.
As Armacost elaborates: “I pictured myself playing Ornette Coleman’s Lonely Woman in the studio with a trio – double bassist Robert Hurst and drummer Jeff ‘Tain’ Watts. Tain was, in terms of time signature, out on his own, and Bob and I were communicating with each other independently of what he was playing. But what Tain was doing was so incredibly attractive – so fiery and so beautiful – that we both really wanted to go over and be part of that; yet we already had this thing that we had to do together. That whole idea of people relating to each other in the time, but in a non-traditional way, and creating tension which would eventually be resolved by them going over to play together, was something I’d never tried before – and the concept was really exciting. To achieve this, technology might have been the answer. But in the end, we decided to record in Tain’s studio, in an intimate live environment with no separation” (occasional left/right panning helps with the visualisation). “So for my compositions and arrangements, I needed to imagine the ideas happening in real time; and fortunately, with Tain and Bob on board – some of the most swinging musicians on the planet – there was a great, combined willingness for exploration, to make it happen.” Joining the trio on selected tracks is pianist David Kikoski, providing elegant, rippling color to numbers such as ‘The Next 20’ and ‘One and Four’.
Through the dedication of these accomplished artists, such a challenging brief has evolved into a project which is incredibly organic, purposeful and sumptuously swinging. The three ‘Sculptures’ on the album are very much an expression of this structured experimentation. ‘Phase Shift’ is modelled on an ‘X’ formation, as Armacost and Watts converge along the left tempo pathways, with Hurst on the right until saxophonist and bassist change places (an E flat to C piano key-change marks the crossover point) – technical in construction, but an exhilarating listen. In ‘Tempus Funkit’, Armacost independently visits the rhythms of drummer and bassist; and the particle-like conflict of ‘All The Things You Could Become In The Large Hadron Collider’ (based on ‘All The Things You Are’) is also a playful reference to Charles Mingus’ ‘All The Things You Could Be By Now If Sigmund Freud’s Wife Was Your Mother’.
‘Lonely Woman’ – the seed of this album which germinated so many possibilities – features a call-and-response between tenor and bass (with each saying, “Check out the way I’m playing the melody”), initiating their own improvisations until the drums home in on the bassist (as Tim puts it, “He can’t resist”). So the differing musical tensions are intentionally part of the unplanned dialogue present throughout this recording. In title track ‘Time Being’, the trio divides when tenor moves to a different tempo, with Hurst following, and Watts reaching them later – as Armacost enthuses: “When we all come back together, the pay-off is really delicious!” Pacey ’53rd Street’ is inspired by the blues melody of Thelonious Monk’s ’52nd Street’; there’s a fine, percussively buoyant interpretation of Monk’s ‘Teo’; and feisty, original composition ‘Alawain’ says so much about this trio’s collective, impassioned spirit.
Tim Armacost describes the session as being playful, wild and serious: “It has been a real source of joy, for me, to see such open musicians willing to make an attempt at something we’ve never done before; and especially when things got kinda interesting, and we started smiling – that was a really special, even relaxed experience. I hope that, although this has a demanding concept at its roots, listeners can pick up on its lyrical, singing qualities. The audience is very much part of the conversation – we’re doing this thing together, and we invite you in… to have fun!”


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