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Bebop Spoken There

Ethan Iverson: "I asked Bertha [Hope] if she ever used the word "contrafact" to describe the process of writing new tunes over old changes, and she replied, "Of course not. The only people who used that word went to a university to learn about jazz."" - (Jazz Times March 2020).

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COFID- 19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Monday, October 03, 2016

Tcha Limberger & His Budapest Gypsy Orchestra @ Sage Gateshead. October 2

Tcha Limberger (violin & vocals), Feher Istvan (cimbalom), Lukás Csaba (clarinet), Olah Norbert (brac), Ruszo Istvan (violin) & Vilmos Csikos (double bass)
(Review by Russell/Photo courtesy of Peter Ninnim).
Manouche multi-instrumentalist Tcha Limberger grew up on Django. At six he began to play guitar, he has long since attained virtuoso status. At a comparatively late age (all of seventeen) he decided to learn to play the violin. In next to no time Limberger was more than proficient, in fact, a virtuoso.
Tcha Limberger arrived at Sage Gateshead to fulfill the final date on a nationwide tour. A receptive Sage Two audience greeted the Belgian and his Budapest Gypsy Orchestra with enthusiasm. Some had heard Limberger on a previous visit, others were new to his music. The evening began with one noticeable absentee – the indisposed cellist Szegfu Károly – as the band elected to perform as a sextet.
Sage Two’s exceptional acoustics didn’t escape the ear of Limberger and the band played entirely without amplification (Vilmos Csikos’ double bass included) and no requirement for a PA system. The engaging Limberger spoke in impeccable English, his voice clearly heard throughout the hall, and sang in, no doubt, perfect Hungarian. A clever man is Tcha Limberger!             

Hungarian musicians advised Limberger that he would never be able to fully appreciate a music alien to him, a language he didn’t speak. Undeterred, our violin virtuoso decided to learn the language! On stage at Sage Gateshead, the Belgian-born musician led his Gypsy Orchestra as a fully paid up member of Budapest’s music fraternity. A master violinist, a tenor voice of unbridled passion, Limberger’s assimilation of the nuances of a nineteenth-century musical form, hitherto a foreign culture to him, impressed not only the Gateshead audience, but also his Hungarian comrades. Song titles weren’t announced; Limberger’s assertion that all of them were about universal themes – love, heartbreak etc – met with a collective nod of approval. Spectacular cadenzas, effortless, swashbuckling solos, Tcha Limberger had it all.

Standing in front of Feher Istvan’s cimbalom, our Manouche bandleader turned variously left to invite the seated clarinet master Lukás Csaba to rise and unleash unbelievable solo contributions, the speed of which defied eyes and ears; then to Feher to breeze across the many hundreds of strings of the cimbalom. Csaba elicited the cry: Bravo! Feher received thunderous applause. Dazzling and dizzying, each and every number captivated those in attendance. Limberger drew our attention to the work of Olah Norbert. Sitting to Tcha’s right, the role of the brac instrument, we learned, is central to the music. Continuously in action, the viola, as known to Western audiences, took on a new dimension! Double bass player Vilmos Csikos deployed unamplified, lower register bowing throughout. This was a Sage Gateshead master class from all concerned. The virtuoso sextet deservedly won an encore. Until next time…                                 
Russell.

2 comments :

Patti D. said...

It was a wonderful concert - full of passion and musical dexterity - it didn't matter that we couldn't speak Hungarian ..... the emotions overflowed from the stage!

Unknown said...

Hello Patti would to ask about the concert if you have any vidoe you want to send thanks

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