Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Ethan Iverson: "I asked Bertha [Hope] if she ever used the word "contrafact" to describe the process of writing new tunes over old changes, and she replied, "Of course not. The only people who used that word went to a university to learn about jazz."" - (Jazz Times March 2020).

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COFID- 19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Thursday, October 13, 2016

New book out soon - Forty-five years of jazz images come together – from Abercrombie to Zirilli

(Press Release).
A stunning new book – ‘Brian O’Connor’s Images of Jazz’ – of more than 400 photographs of jazz musicians taken over 45 years has been published by Riverside Publishing Solutions.
The book captures striking and atmospheric black and white and colour photos of musicians taken at more than 60 venues in London and across the UK between 1971 and 2016. It includes photos of UK and visiting American and European musicians both onstage and informally. Several musicians are featured at different stages of their careers, from exuberant youth to successful maturity.
Brian introduces the photos with affectionate notes about his regular visits to Ronnie Scott’s club and other venues, and shares insights into the life of the jazz photographer, capturing the moment. In addition, there are notes on photographic technique and equipment for the camera enthusiast, and a detailed index of musicians.

Bass player Peter Ind writes in the Foreword:
“The art of conveying life, dynamism and movement is hardly ever better expressed than it is in still photography of jazz musicians playing. This new book of jazz photography fully illustrates this and it is the work of an unassuming man who has a great eye – Brian O Connor.  We should all thank him for his dedicated work ensuring that there is a record forever of some fabulous jazz moments.”
Pianist and singer Liane Carroll writes in the book on behalf of the National Jazz Archive, which helped with its publication:
“The astounding photographs bring to life the musicians who contributed so much to the wonderful art form we know as jazz. The remarkable images that appear in Brian O’Connor’s new collection add to that rich heritage and tradition.”
Brian O’Connor’s Images of Jazz’ is due to be published in the middle of October, by Riverside Publishing Solutions, in association with the National Jazz Archive. The book is A4 hardback, 132 pages printed in colour throughout, ISBN 978-1-5272-0057-9. The book is priced at £25 plus £4.95 post and packing (UK), but the price for orders placed before 24th December 2016 is £20 plus p&p.
For more information and to order the book, contact Brian O’Connor, 48 Sarel Way, Horley, Surrey RH6 8EW. Tel: 01293 774171. Email: info@imagesofjazz.com. www.imagesofjazz.com

The author/photographer:
Brian O’Connor’s working life mainly consisted of working in and sometimes running a series of camera shops in and around London. His interest in photography began at an early age, and his first ‘upmarket’ camera was a used Ilford Sportsman costing £6.
His musical interests began with Frank Sinatra and ‘That Old Black Magic’ in the early fifties, and progressed with the rhythms and tunes of Latin American music, in particular Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd’s LP, Jazz Samba. He joined the Sinatra Music Society and met Stan Britt, a founder member of the Society. This led on to the Great American Songbook.
His two hobbies blended at the beginning of the seventies. Stan Britt had become a freelance journalist and began interviewing many of the jazz greats, and Brian joined him with his camera. Through Stan he also became a regular at Ronnie Scott’s. For about 30 years he was there nearly every week, listening and photographing.

The first gig he photographed was Blood, Sweat and Tears at the Hammersmith Odeon in 1971, and he continues to visit pubs, clubs and festivals, adding to his collection of photos of more than 2000 musicians.

No comments :

Blog Archive