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Bebop Spoken There

Ethan Iverson: "I asked Bertha [Hope] if she ever used the word "contrafact" to describe the process of writing new tunes over old changes, and she replied, "Of course not. The only people who used that word went to a university to learn about jazz."" - (Jazz Times March 2020).

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COFID- 19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Saturday, October 29, 2016

CD Review: The Big Shake-up.

Jon Stokes (tmb); Jean-Paul Gervasoni, Paul Munday, Gavin Broom;(tpt/flug); Sam Bullard (alt/ten); Gemma Moore (bar/fl); Mike Poyser (sousa); Jimmy Norden (dms/perc); Sharleen Linton (vcl).
(Review by Lance).
You start feeling old when you see Dave O'Higgins  (composer of the title track) referred to in the notes as a British Jazz Legend! To me, a British Jazz Legend is Nat Gonella, Tubby Hayes, Humph,     Ronnie etc. However, as O'Higgins is now 52 he may well be approaching that accolade although I still think of him as one of the rising stars! I mean, in jazz you've got to be either dead or pretty close to it to become a legend!

The Big Shake-Up, formerly known as Bad Ass Brass, are indeed brass heavy but not, despite the title track, a Dirty Dozen marching street band. If they do any marching it will be on slightly up-market avenues. This is not to, in any way, denigrate the music which is superb. Arranged by Callum Au, who is fast becoming a force in British jazz since I first heard his big band at the Spice of Life a few years back, Callum sets his stall out well. Check it out at the Elgar Room in the pomp and circumstance of the Royal Albert Hall (London) on November 20 as part of the EFG London Jazz Festival,
Other than Linton's vocal on God Bless the Child and O'Higgins' piece, the others are by Russell Bennett. Worth a spin.
Lance.

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