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Bebop Spoken There

Diana Krall: "It was daunting to play in front of her [Joni Mitchell] but it was also wonderful." - (DownBeat October 2019).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Friday September 20

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see above).

Rendezvous Jazz - Monkseaton Arms, Front Street, Monkseaton NE25 8DP. Tel: 0191 251 3928. 1:00pm. Free.

Classic Swing - Jesmond Royal British Legion Club, West Jesmond Avenue, Jesmond, Newcastle NE2 3EX. Tel: 0191 281 0736. 1:00pm. Free.

Mark Williams Trio - The Merry Monk, 30 Market Place, Bishop Auckland DL14 7NP. 1:00pm. £5.00. Pub adjacent to Bishop Auckland Town Hall.

Evening.

Alexito & Loco Machine - Revoluçion de Cuba, Cloth Market, Newcastle NE1 1EE. Tel: 0191 917 7076. 6:00pm. Free.

Jazz Lads - Saltburn Cricket Club, Marske Mill Lane, Saltburn TS12 1HJ. Tel: 01287 622761. 8:00pm. £5.00.

Zoë Gilby: Watching Sideways - Victoria Tunnel, Ouse Street, Newcastle NE1 2BE. Tel: 0191 230 4210. 8:00pm. £10.00.

Mark Williams & Pete Tanton - The Golden Lion, Market Place, Allendale NE47 9BD. Tel: 01434 683225. 9:00pm. Free.

Blues/Soul etc.

No Time For Jive - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9pm. Free.

Nick Pride & the Pimptones - Hoochie Coochie, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle NE1 6SF. Tel: 0191 222 0130. 9:00pm. Free.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Ian Shaw & the Theory of Joy Trio @ Sage Gateshead. June 15

Ian Shaw (vocals), Barry Green (piano), Mick Hutton (double bass) & Dave Ohm (drums)
(Review by Russell)
Ian Shaw likes Joni Mitchell. Assuming they’ve never met, it’s a fair bet Mitchell would like Shaw. In Sage Two, Ian Shaw entertained as vocalist, as storyteller. Opening his set with Mitchell’s In France They Kiss on Main Street, Shaw and the Theory of Joy – a trio worthy of a gig in its own right – delivered an intimate performance, singing and talking to an adoring audience.
Shaw – composer, vocalist, pianist and stand-up comedian – returned to Sage Gateshead a matter of weeks after starring at the Gateshead International Jazz Festival. This time he left the piano playing to Barry Green. Singing a selection of songs from his new CD The Theory of Joy, the man from north Wales reaffirmed his status as a vocal superstar. Kurt Elling, Tony Bennett, they exude a nonchalant command of their art, so too Ian Shaw. A swinging All This and Betty Too showcased the trio’s jazz credentials as Shaw paid dues to Ms Betty Carter. Between times Shaw’s storytelling threatened epic proportions. The one about the cheese pasty, the micro wave and hiding in a Nuneaton cupboard (all true, ask him about it sometime) had our man strolling the stage, the timing, that of a natural, then turning to his band mates in self-admonishment, suggesting he’d talked too long and they would, perhaps, have to cut a number from the set but not before singing Leonard Cohen’s Dance Me to the End of Love.

Shaw the campaigner: fundraiser and friend to the many displaced persons abandoned to their fate on the high seas of xenophobia, spoke eloquently, an informed voice. There is zero chance of Shaw’s words appearing front page on the red tops. He does what he can. My Brother is a song for our times.

Second set: You’ve Got to Pick a Pocket or Two. See it as a show tune if you will, hear it as a commentary on our ‘all in it together’ times. Shaw mentioned the double vinyl (and digital download) release of The Theory of Joy contained three bonus tracks (he admitted he didn’t have a vinyl copy of his own record). He sang one of them – Last Man Alive. A vocal range to die for (several singers were in the audience…what were they thinking?), the main man sang Michel Legrand’s How Do You Keep the Music Playing? The trio did get the opportunity to stretch out on a couple of numbers as Shaw confided he can find it difficult to work with bass players other than Mick Hutton, so highly does he regard his musicianship, and drummer Dave Ohm is similarly in the ‘first call’ category.       

For an encore Ian Shaw sang Somewhere Towards Love. Passionate, perhaps sentimental, but so effective. 

Russell.         

3 comments :

Jen Errington said...

I agree with Russell that the vocals and the trio were superb. However, I went to the Sage to listen to a full performance of music. I was not expecting to sit for 20 minutes in the first half hearing about Ian's childhood in Wales and in particular his bed wetting antics. Nor a further 15 minutes in the 2nd half having to listen to the incident of the cheese pasty. In addition, his references to refugees/gays/the incident in Orlando, and politicians with whom he didn't agree with, in my opinion, were completely out of place. This is the first time I have heard Ian Shaw as a solo artist and guess what? I won't be seeing him again!

Hugh said...

Good review, Russell - tells it as it was. I can see Jen's point regarding the repartee. The route from Shaw's North Wales Presbyterian childhood to "prairie tortoise" was somewhat convoluted - and he had to be reminded by the band that he had not actually delivered the punchline!

Up with the greats as far as his singing goes, though, no doubt. Shame there weren't more there though, as we noted at the time. The album is excellent too, surprised he did not have a few to sell, even if he does not have a copy of the vinyl double album himself!

JC said...

A great review of a fascinating and multi-layered gig. Some music and musicians have always used their talent to engage with what is happening in the world around them and Ian Shaw is one. He makes no secret of his commitment to a variety of social and political causes and to me that adds to the intensity of his singing. This is not to say he gives political lectures but rather makes his comments with wit and respect and then uses all his vocal ability to transform what sometimes could be fairly ordinary show tunes into something exceptional.
His last song was a fine example of this. He introduced it by talking about attending the vigil in Soho for those killed in the Orlando shootings and how he had heard that refugees in Calais had also held their own event. He said the song had been written by two gay, Jewish men in the 1950s, both the sons of immigrants and the show ended with him singing beautifully the song from West Side Story, There's a Place for Us.
JC

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance