Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Dave Puddy: "Eventually we paid our entrance money [to Eel Pie Island] and fought our way to one of the many bars where we could buy our Newcastle Brown and retire to the back of the heaving dancefloor. There must have been lights somewhere, but my memory remains of being in some dark cavernous wonderland." - (Just Jazz July 2020)

Dave Rempis:Ten years from now, I can see musicians streaming concerts in real time and charging a minimal amount for people to watch.” - (DownBeat September 2013)

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

Postage

11,612 (and counting) posts since we started blogging just over 12 years ago. 747 of them this year alone and, so far, 11 this month (July 3).

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.
------
Born This Day
Louis Armstrong and Steve Andrews.

Saturday, March 09, 2013

Tommy Emmanuel & Martin Taylor @ The Sage - Take 2.

(Review by Ron Ainsborough)
The definition of 'jazz or not jazz', discussion raises it head once again after going to this concert, but as many a person has said before me 'there are only two kinds of music, good or bad!' Well this concert was 'good music' without a doubt.
The concert featured Tommy Emmanuel and Martin Taylor playing solo and as a duo for two sets about an hour each, playing to a near sell out audience at The Sage.
I have seen and heard Martin Taylor before so I already knew he is a world class acoustic guitar musician, but with just being made aware recently of Tommy Emmanuel and never ever having heard him play live (I did check him out on YouTube though!) , we awaited to see him with great anticipation.
Boy! we were not disappointed! The Aussie fretman was absolutely sensational, playing every genre of music from jazz to popular music, including a medley of Beatles songs, jazz standards, calypso music and 'classical gas' together with his own, and Martin Taylor's, compositions.
The technique and musicianship required to simultaneously create the multi sounds encompassing 'rhythm, harmony and melody', seems unbelievable yet the beautiful sounds he is making are from a SOLO artist, without the use of  pedals etc, and it's all happening on the stage in front of you.The dynamics of his music are phenomenal and I know it's a cliché but it has to be said,'you would think their were several guitarists playing with him' to obtain the complex beautiful sounds that he creates.
From the very beginning of the concert to the end I was on the edge of my seat wondering what incredible guitar sounds are you going to hear next, I have never heard or seen guitar musicianship (from both musicians I might add) of that calibre before. A wonderful concert!!!!
Having said all that, I must not sidetrack Martin Taylor in any shape or form. Most, if not all, of what I have said applies to Martin Taylor as well, because he was every bit an integral part of the concert, who made an enormous contribution to the evening.
The duo renditions were breathtaking and exquisite. The sounds Martin Taylor made whilst playing his 'calypso' composition were created by inserting a piece of cardboard in to the sound box of the guitar giving a percussive sound,and also during the same number Tommy Emmanuel demonstrated that by tapping his guitar with his hands in a 'conga drum style' (I believe the name for a congo drummer is a 'conguero'),the 'conguero Tommy Emmanuel' played a most wonderful and exciting, strictly percussive solo which had to be seen to be believed.
Ron Ainsborough

No comments :

Blog Archive