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Bebop Spoken There

Giovanni Guidi: "So many jazz albums today are all original compositions, and five minutes after the record is finished, you can't remember a single song. I think it's a problem." - (JazzTimes Oct. 2019).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Friday October 18

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see above).

Classic Swing - Jesmond Royal British Legion Club, West Jesmond Avenue, Jesmond, Newcastle NE2 3EX. Tel: 0191 281 0736. 1:00pm. Free.

Rendezvous Jazz - Monkseaton Arms, Front Street, Monkseaton NE25 8DP. Tel: 0191 251 3928. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening.

Ella Fitzgerald: Just One of Those Things - Forum Cinema, Market Place, Hexham NE46 1XF. Tel: 01434 601144. 7:00pm. £8.30. - £5.80. Film (2019, 89 mins) directed by Leslie Woodhead. Swing Bridge Trio in Café Bar following screening.

Dave O’Higgins & Colin Oxley - Great Broughton Village Hall, Ingleby Road, Great Broughton TS9 7ER. 7:30pm. £20.00. ‘O’Higgins & Oxley Play Monk & ‘Trane’. Oxley replaces Rob Luft.

Paul Taylor - Ushaw College, Durham DH7 7DW. Tel: 0191 334 5119. 7:30pm. Free (donations). An Ushaw Piano Festival event.

Jazz Lads - Saltburn Cricket Club, Marske Mill Lane, Saltburn TS12 1HJ. Tel: 01287 622761. 8:00pm. £5.00.

Guisborough Big Band - Saltburn Golf Club, Guisborough Road, Saltburn TS12 1NJ. Tel: 01287 622812. Time TBC.

Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool - Tyneside Cinema, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle NE1 6QG. Tel: 0191 227 5500. Time 8:30pm. Screening of Stanley Nelson's documentary film (2019, cert. 15, 1hr 55mins).

Blues/Soul etc.

Ray Stubbs R & B All Stars - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9pm. Free.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, June 15, 2012

World Service Project & Alfie Ryner @ Star & Shadow Cinema. June 14

World Service Project: Dave Morecroft (keyboards), Raphael Clarkson (trombone), Tim Ower (alto & tenor saxophones), Conor Chaplin (electric bass) & Neil Blandford (drums)
Alfie Ryner: Paco Serrano (alto & tenor saxophones, vocals), Guillaume Pique (trombone & vocals), Gerard Gimenez (guitar), Guillaume Gendre (double bass) & Loris Pertoldi (drums)

(Review by Russell).
Dave Morecroft’s World Service Project made a third visit to Newcastle and this Jazz North East promotion was the second Match & Fuse project to be heard at the Star and Shadow Cinema. Morecroft’s ongoing mission is to invite a band from Europe to play a series of double-bill gigs in Britain and secure a reciprocal tour; on this occasion the invitees – Alfie Ryner is/are a quintet of seemingly disparate musicians - travelled from Toulouse, France. Morecroft’s five piece took to the stage first and much of the music performed can be heard on Match and Fuse CDs numbers 3 and 4 and the current release (check-out Wes’ recent review on Bebop Spoken Here). WSP played it loud and rocked it. Raphael Clarkson’s big trombone sound impressed once again and front line partner Tim Ower (saxophones) played with self-assurance, so too bassist Conor Chaplin. Manic Morecroft stoked it up showering burning embers over Neil Blandford’s granite rhythms. Solos were short and few and far between, collective riffs caught the ear and won keen applause from an appreciative crowd.


French quintet Alfie Ryner (Morecroft dubbed them ‘Alfie Ryan Air’) emerged from back stage in suits (more rude boy than zoot ) and resembled a motley crew of musos – and they were, musos, that is - sporting earrings and other piercings that would have had Gene Hackman on his guard down in Marseille. Paco Serrano wore the look of a slightly deranged smiling assassin (think The French Connection or Goodfellas) yet turned out to be a big pussycat. Serrano’s vocals, in French of course, were largely inaudible due to the volume levels of the amplified band. No matter, whatever it was he told us, he meant it. He blew some alto, Guillaume Pique played some plungered trombone and Gerard Gimenez’s Fender featured heavily - effects and all. The material was Gallic and varied (a tango worked well) and the drum and bass team of Loris Pertoldi (drums) and Guillaume Gendre worked tirelessly. Gendre was, ostensibly, the ‘jazz’ player in the line-up, yet, surely, all could turn their hand to straight ahead material. The now familiar Match & Fuse finale united the two bands - British and French musicians on stage together – to play two numbers. The first, led by Morecroft, reworked Sweet Time, a tune written by Matt Jacobsen (drummer with Irish band ReDiViDer and former collaborator with WSP). The Toulouse troupe read their parts with smiles all round. The closing number - an ‘instant composition’ or as Serrano would have it a ‘sound painting’ – took the honours by a mile or should that be a kilometre? The big pussycat leapt down from the stage to the floor of the auditorium to conduct the piece. No baton just innumerable hand signals. This time the Brits had to concentrate. The legendary George Russell had an idiosyncratic style directing his big band, similarly Chris Sharkey’s commands with Jambone are somewhat unique. The committed Serrano (perhaps he should be) worked-up a sweat and boy, he had the double quintet in a sweat. Some how he pulled it off.
Russell

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance