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Bebop Spoken There

Poncho Sanchez: "When I perform it's my life story." - (DownBeat October 2019).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Thursday September 19

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see above).

Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Road, Holystone NE27 0DA. Tel: 0191 266 6173. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

Jazz

Alexito & Loco Machine - Revoluçion de Cuba, Cloth Market, Newcastle NE1 1EE. Tel: 0191 917 7076. 6:00pm. Free.

Jeremy McMurray & the Pocket Jazz Orchestra - Arc, Dovecot St., Stockton on Tees TS18 1LL. Tel: 01642 525199. 7:00pm. £12.00. + £0.10. bf. ‘Jazz & Tapas’ (booking essential). Guest: Alice Grace.

Bradley Johnston Quartet - St James' & St Basil's Church, Fenham Hall Drive, Fenham, Newcastle NE4 9EJ. 7:30pm. £8.00. (£4.00. student).

Sudden Jazz Quintet - The Globe, Railway Street, Newcastle NE4 7AD. 7:30pm. Free (donations).

Eclectic - Tees Hot Club, Dorman’s Club, Oxford Road, Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. Tel: 01642 823813. 9:00pm. Free. Rick Laughlin (keys); Alan Thompson, Dan Johnson, Sue Ferris, Josh Bentham (saxes); Ian Halford (drums).

Maine Street Jazzmen - Sunniside Social Club, Hollywell Lane, Sunniside, Gateshead NE16 5NA. Tel: 0191 488 7347. 8:30pm. Free.

New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton on Tees TS18 4AW. 8:30pm. £2.50.

Blues/Soul/Funk

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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Tuesday, June 05, 2012

Take the Metro Train and make sure they Drop You Off at Tynemouth

(Review by Russell).
St.James’ Metro station. People get ready there’s a train a-comin’. Get on board. Next stop Monument. Margaret B. got on board, two jazz-loving Americans in tow. Welcome aboard the 12:16 Jazz Age Time Travel Special! The next station is Tynemouth. Alight here for the Roaring Twenties. Blue Skies. Sun beating down, cracking the refurbished glass roof canopy, the station platform resembled Grand Central Station at rush hour. Excuse me, thank you. Excuse me, thanks.
Making headway through the throng took time and patience. A familiar face here (Norman), over there (Dave K) and that’s Roly (on the bandstand – give him a wave). Hi Ruth (looking cool in black, expressing concern at the unfamiliar keys on which she was about to exercise her vocals chords). Maureen H had secured a spot half way up the stairs (over there to your left). Over on the right a local politician – just out of reach of a left hook - was basking in the reflected glory of the assembled talent. 
The talent: John Carstairs Hallam’s Sweet and Hot Orchestra: John Carstairs Hallam (double bass), Brian Chester (piano), Roly Veitch (guitar), Ian Forbes (drums), Jim McBriarty (alto saxophone, clarinet & vocals), Alan Marshall (alto saxophone & clarinet), Gavin Lee (tenor saxophone), Sue Ferris (tenor and baritone saxophones, clarinet), Alan Smith (trumpet), Mick Hill (trumpet), Neville Hartley (trombone), Don Fairley (trombone) & Ruth Lambert (vocals). 
St.Louis Blues signalled the start of the one hour set. Drummer Ian Forbes’ crisp work set-up the brass section, reeds followed with the rhythm section well oiled (musically you understand – this was a professional engagement). All on the stand were reading their parts determined to meet MD Carstairs Hallam’s exacting standards. The avuncular bandleader had clearly devoted many hours to lovingly arranging the material. Jeepers Creepers, A Tisket A Tasket (great vocal by Ruth ‘Ella’ Lambert), Moonlight Serenade, A String of Pearls, South of the Border and The Palais Glide (expertly arranged)  were but a few of many familiar dance band numbers. 
Camera phones were held aloft to capture the moment, couples danced and jugglers kept their eyes firmly on the tools of their trade as stilt walkers turned many a head. The next train out of town pulled into Platform 1. All aboard for the Crescent Club Jazz Special! Down the tracks to Cullercoats Bay the seahorses reared-up, then, backs broken, lay spent, exhausted on the sands. 
Inside, the place was busy. The second set was about to begin. A seat was offered, most welcome. The JCH Sweet and Hot had recruited one or two of the house band regulars for the day along the line at Tynemouth so deps were called in and they proved more than able. Bassist Bill Colledge came over from the South Side and the inimitable Roy Gibson played piano. Regular front man Iain MacAulay added another six strings to his bow – he played guitar during drummer Ollie Rilland’s rock ‘n’ roll medley – and clarinetist Derek Fleck sat and played as if in his own front room (relaxed I’d say!). Teresa Armstrong and John Broddle sang. The great Doris Fenn (ukulele) sat in second set. 
The day had started in Tynemouth with St.Louis Blues and - what’s the odds? – finished in Cullercoats with St.Louis Blues. For the record: Iain MacAulay (trombone, trumpet, guitar & vocals), Derek Fleck (clarinet), Roy Gibson (keyboards), Bill Colledge (electric bass), Ollie Rillands (drums & vocals), Doris Fenn (ukulele), Teresa Armstrong (vocals) & John Broddle (vocals). 
Next train Newcastle. In toon we called into Marks and Spencers for a pot of tea, a black coffee and teacakes. Aye, we jazzers live life in the fast lane.
Photos Courtesy of Carstairs.
Russell  

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance