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Bebop Spoken There

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Wednesday, December 30, 2009

The Jazz Esquires @ The Porthole - Not Smooth Sailing.

Mick Hill (tpt), Terry Dalton (tmb), Tony Winder (ten/clt), Roy Gibson (pno), Robin Douthwaite (gtr), Stan Nicholson (bs), Laurie Brown (dms). + George Laing (pno), Miles Watson (vcl), Teresa Armstrong (vcl).
Going to the Porthole, is always a bit of an adventure for us 'southerners' involving, as it does, a ferry journey across the Tyne from South Shields to North Shields. Today's mini-cruise - all seven minutes of it - foretold of things to come as my legs felt distinctly rubbery as I walked down the gangplank and onto the ferry landing which was bobbing around somewhat more than usual.
However, by the time I'd walked the short distance to the waterfront pub equillibrum was returned.
The Jazz Esquires were on form today blowing in the manner of the old Lyttleton Band - the one with Skidmore, Temperley and Coe - on "In A Mellotone", "Doggin' Around", "Big Swing Face", "East of the Sun", "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home to" and others of similar ilk.
Mick Hill had some Buck Clayton/Roy Eldridge inspired moments occasionally shooting for the stars and, at other times, delicately muted.
Trombone player Terry, he of the Dalton Dynasty, blew smooth with a rich Urbie Green-like tone whilst Tony Winder played good middle-period tenor.
Aided and abetted by a solid rhythm section that soloed well in their own right it made for an enjoyable afternoon.
During the interval George Laing, still recovering from his fall from a roof, limped exquisitely through "Tramp" and "Georgia" before Teresa sang some and Miles Watson hollored some blues choruses.
I left for the ferry with a spring in my step which, upon reaching the ferry landing turned once more into a rolling gait. I swear I thought the landing was going to capsize!
It was even worse on board as wind and wave tossed the ferry from port to starboard and back again. I half expected a band to strike up with "For Those In Peril on the Sea."
Amazingly the craft made it to South Shields and the passengers gave thanks for their deliverance.
Lance.

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