Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Clare Teal: "If you're brought up in a working-class family, you haven't got money for records so everything you get hold of, you treasure, learn to love, and I loved those Ella tapes." - (Radio Times 23-29 January 2021)

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

Postage

12,393 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 12 years ago. 112 of them this year alone and, so far, 112 this month (Jan. 23).

Friday, November 27, 2020

Furloughed on Radio 3

Prior to the current situation I'd only associated the word furlough with wartime G.I.s - over here we called it leave. However, like other Americanisms such as take a rain-check or a ballpark figure, both baseball related expressions, furlough is now a well and truly established buzzword in our UK vocabulary.

Brian Ebbatson tells me that Radio 3, this morning, played a couple of tracks with furlough in the title.

One was A Fellow on a Furlough by Glenn Miller and the Army Air Force band and the second was Furlough Blues by an Earl Hines Big Band in 1945.

Brian, understandably, prefers the Hines disc although the Miller recording has a vocal by Johnny Desmond who, had he been able to dodge the draft with a punctured eardrum, could have been a contender in the 1940's heartthrob stakes. As it was he did earn the title of The Creamer and it wasn't necessarily for his voice!

The Hines disc also has a vocalist. A singer with a deep heavy vibrato not too far removed from Billy Eckstine. Lord Essex was his stage name. Essex? Eckstine? could this have been Mr B using a pseudonym? After all he did start out with the Hines band.

However, further research revealed that "Lord Essex" was actually Scott Essex. The story that got around was that Hines' manager thought Scott Essex sounded too ordinary so he said, "We've got a Duke, a Count and an Earl so let's have a Lord" which put the mockers on my theory!

Still, the research gave me something to do whilst on furlough!*

Lance

*I've actually been furloughed for the past 20 years!

1 comment :

Hugh said...

I was listening to this item in the car on the way to work - "furlough" is actually from a Dutch word - verlof, apparently.

Furlough is/was also used in the context of missionaries returning to the UK (or elsewhere) from the mission field for a period of leave.

Blog archive