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Bebop Spoken There

Buddy Guy: "I've never made a record I liked." - (The New Yorker March, 2019)

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Today Wednesday March 20

Afternoon

Jazz

Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Evening

Take it to the Bridge - The Globe, Railway Street, Newcastle NE4 7AD. 8:00pm. £1.00.

Lieko Quintet + purpleshirt - Bar Loco, Leazes Park Road, Newcastle NE1 4PG. Tel: 0191 232 5871. 7:30pm. Free.

Blues

Moonshine Sessions - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 8:30pm. Free.

The Exchange Blues - The Exchange, Howard St., North Shields NE30 1SE. Tel: 0191 258 4111. 8:00pm. Free. Fortnightly blues jam session.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Sunday, December 23, 2018

A Jazzy Christmas @ Ushaw - Dec. 20

(Review by Steve T/PHOTOS courtesy of Ken Drew) 


Thursday - the day after the Christmas party - found us in Co. Durham’s largest town during a rush-hour bomb scare which left half the town in lockdown and the other half in gridlock. Since the car was in the lockdown zone we took a bus through the gridlock zone for a crazy, hour-long, stop-start bus journey which left me talking into a bag by the time we hit the mean streets of Bishop Auckland.

Turned up at Ushaw just in the nick of time, after Mrs T had to stop (her crazy stop-start driving) at the bottom of the drive, with another stop - in Spennymoor - during the homeward journey.

It took a full two days to recover fully allowing the battery-powered, roadside recoverer, anonymous alcololic, the lovely Ann Alex (did anyone see what I did there?) to get her review in for the following night ahead of me, making my task somewhat easier: what she said.


Actually the two shows were almost identical but totally different. Sage Gateshead looked splendid but the theatre at Ushaw has an innate fairy-tale quality which makes it perfect for this type of thing. Ushaw was generally more relaxed, which makes no qualitative judgement, and we were fortunate to be incentivised to do both. The various horn players dotted around the theatre for Drummer Boy seemed to work better at Ushaw, or was it just that on Friday we were expecting it.

It's clear we all got our annual top-ten lists in too early this year, but the beauty of ten is that twelve is also a 'power' number. They say men never grow up and I've loved Christmas throughout my life, throughout its twists and turns, through all the instalments of it that life throws at you - captured wonderfully on Paul’s future Christmas number one - and I started thinking, (more on Friday, but maybe because by then I was pretty sure I wasn't going to need a quick exit) if I continue to become more sentimental and nostalgic as (if) I grow older, I may not be able to listen to music in public.

Unfair to single anybody out, but Matt Anderson was dominant throughout, with Graham Hardy reaffirming why he's a beast. The respective violinists across the two nights brought new moments of sublime jouissance to familiar classics and the girls in the corner were wonderful.
 
Paul Edis continues to enrich our region and I'm not going to denigrate him by comparing him to that bunch in the other place but, it's on nights like these, we dare to think we may be in the presence of greatness. Not forgetting that behind every great man there's a great woman, and credit to Kate Edis for co-writing the Christmas song and inspiring Matt Anderson’s uplifting rendition of Driving Home for Christmas; one of the few modern Christmas songs people genuinely seem to like. 

The big problem they face next year is that, if everybody who was there tells just one person (and I have a list), where do we all go? But that's the sort of problem we like. 

Steve T.
Paul Edis (piano, vocals); Jo Harrop (vocals); Andy Champion (bass); Russ Morgan (drums); Matt Anderson (tenor & soprano sax); Francis Tulip (guitar); John Paul Garner (violin); Graham Hardy (trumpet, flugel); Jason Holcomb (trombone); Faye Thompson (alto sax, clarinet); Megan Robinson (flute).

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
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