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Bebop Spoken There

Kasia Delgado: "The naughtiest thing that I did at school was bunk off a maths lesson to practice my saxophone for a jazz band." - (i newspaper October 21, 2021)

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.
Ann Braithwaite (Braithwaite & Katz Communications) You’re the BEST! --

Postage

13,837 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 13 years ago. 1254 of them this year alone and, so far, 66 this month (Oct. 23).

From This Moment On ...

October

Sun 24 Vieux Carré Hot 4 @ Spanish City, Whitley Bay. 12 noon.
Sun 24: Musicians Unlimited @ South Durham Social Club, Hartlepool. 1:00pm.
Sun 24: Voices of Virtue Gospel Choir @ The Globe, Newcastle. 4:00pm.
Sun 24: Milne Glendinning Band @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm.

Mon 25: Jazz in the Afternoon @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.

Tue 26: Classic Swing @ Ship inn, Monkseaton. 1:00pm. The post-lockdown resumption of the band’s weekly residency will be fortnightly until further notice.
Tue 26: Jam session @ Black Swan, Newcastle Arts Centre. 8:00pm. The post-lockdown resumption of the Black Swan’s fortnightly jam session.

Wed 27: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.
Wed 27: Darlington Big Band @ Darlington & Simpson Rolling Mills Club, Darlington. 7:00pm. Rehearsal session (open to the public).
Wed 27: Take it to the Bridge @ The Globe, Newcastle. 7:30pm.

Thu 28: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ The Holystone, North Tyneside. 1:00pm.
Thu 28: J Frisco @ Newcastle University. 1:15pm. ONLINE ONLY (YouTube).
Thu 28: ’58 Jazz Collective @ Hops & Cheese, Hartlepool. 7:30pm.
Thu 28: Maine Street Jazzmen @ Sunniside Social Club, Gateshead. 8:30pm.
Thu 28: Tees Hot Club @ Dorman's Club, Middlesbrough. 9:00pm.

Fri 29: James Birkett & Bradley Johnston @ Gala Theatre, Durham. 1:00pm..
Fri 29: Classic Swing @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm..
Fri 29: Rendezvous Jazz @ Monkseaton Arms, Monkseaton. 1:00pm..
Fri 29: New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band @ Oxbridge Hotel, Stockton. 1:00pm.

Sun 31 Vieux Carré Hot 4 @ Spanish City, Whitley Bay. 12 noon..
Sun 31: Musicians Unlimited @ South Durham Social Club, Hartlepool. 1:00pm. .
Sun 31: More Jam @ The Globe, Newcastle. 3:00pm. Jam session..
Sun 31: Alison Rayner Quintet @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm.

Monday, September 17, 2018

Polly Gibbons w. Strictly Smokin' Big Band at Hoochie Coochie - Sept. 16

(Review by Lance).
When Hoochie's head honcho Warren says that Polly Gibbons is in the top ten acts he's heard since he opened the Pilgrim St. venue x years ago it means something considering that amongst that roster is Gregory Porter, Chaka Khan, Mica Paris, Lonnie Smith, Roy Ayers, Joe Stilgoe, Hailey Tuck as well as several hundred others!
Yes, Ms. Gibbons is the real deal.

Two stomping sets that combined jazz and soul, and a few things in between, had the joint jumping and the swing dancers swing dancing.
No holds barred singing. 
Let the Good Times Roll: I heard this hoary old R'n'B classic a couple of weeks back sung by Georgie Fame and Zoot Money at Ronnie's and this version lost nothing by comparision. 

And this was just the beginning! Can't Buy me Love; Too Darn Hot; Don't be on the Outside; a Basin Street Blues to end all Basin Street Blues; a Gibbons' original - Everything Must Change and an amazing Love For Sale. Arranged by Michael Lamb it shaded the famous Buddy Rich version and brought the headliner's first set to a close.
The BSH team, apart from attempting to empty the shelves of London Pride, snapped Polly with trumpet players Pete Tanton (left) and MD Michael Lamb (right). Both players had good solos over the course of the evening.

Back on stage, Thomas Dolby's arrangement of Ability to Swing got the good times rolling once more and the song title couldn't have been more apt for both singer and band.
I'm Just a Lucky So and So; Oh What a Beautiful Morning à la Ray Charles and Count Basie; another couple of originals - Midnight Prayer and You Can't Just; a tribute to Aretha with Dr. Feelgood and, finally, I Let a Song Go Out of my Heart.

Quite a night that had begun with an opening set featuring Alice Grace and the band. I doubt there will be many opportunities to hear two such fantastic singers in the one evening and Alice did the home team proud - her version of Lost in the Memory absolutely stunning. Why have I never heard this song before?

 All the usual suspects soloed and, as always, impressed. The quasi Dixieland finish to Dylan's Don't Think Twice was more than alright.
Way back in the day, at the end of Prologue, Stan Kenton bombastically proclaimed "This is an Orchestra!"
Michael Lamb would be justified in doing the same!
Polly Gibbons (vocal) with:
Michael Lamb (trumpet/MD/arranger); Pete Tanton, Gordon Marshall, Dick Stacey (trumpets); John Flood, Chris Gurgi-Smith, Kieran Parnaby, Mark Ferris (trombones); Steve Summers, Keith Robinson, Paul Gowland, Jamie Toms, Laurie Rangecroft (reeds); Graham Don (piano); Pawel Jedrzejewski (guitar); Michael Whent (bass guitar); Guy Swinton (drums); Alice Grace (vocals).

12 comments :

Ron said...

It was without doubt one of those 'I was there' moments.
A great band and two great singers. What more do you want!

Steve T said...

I note you neglected to mention Jean Carn, or was it deliberate, or perhaps Freudian? One of the absolutely greatest ever voices in recorded music.

Lance said...

I only mentioned the ones that I've seen at Hoochie and I haven't seen Jean Carne.

Steve T said...

Incidentally, the 'e' on the end of Carn is optional. Certainly none of the original albums had it, but it seems to have been added to a British compilation and stuck, at least in this country.
Like many soul singers, particularly of the late seventies period, when disco was king (queen), she only made a handful of brilliant records, but her voice is extraordinary; like Betty Wright, Minnie Ripperton and Anita Baker, though less soulful than Aretha, Linda Jones and Shirley Brown, in the same way that the amazing Johnny Adams is less soulful than OV Wright.
The dead popstar thing is never beneficial (except to the widow(er)) so, if I promise not to claim that Stanley Clark(e) was/is the greatest of all electric bass players (and not Jaco as the rest of the world seems to think), I wonder if he could refrain from making comments which are silly, ill-informed, inaccurate, harmful and insulting to dozens of incredible soul singers.
Been a while since I've hijacked a post for my own agenda. Everybody always has an agenda.

Steve T said...

I'm not much of a googler generally, but I became curious and it seems she added the 'e' at the advice of a numerologist. Course she did.

Russell said...

This post is about Polly Gibbons. However, your comment, Steve, requires a response. Jaco was/is the greatest electric bass player of all time. Anyone with ears couldn't fail to agree.

Steve T said...

Don't think that's how music works Russell. And the post is about many things.

Lance said...

No the post is about Polly G and SSBB. Any additional agenda is really not relevant although worthy of discussion in a seperate post.

Steve T said...

It's about female singers (of which Jean Carn is one), Hoochie Coochie (where she has performed), big bands and if and when they become orchestras, and many other things; you covered quite a lot of ground. To my mind, discussion about music is good and should be encouraged and I seem to recall somebody (who shall remain nameless) saying the last time I hijacked a post, that this is what s/he loved about BSH, that it led to other discussions. I think it's a shame more people don't contribute to general discussions and I certainly don't think it should be discouraged when it happens, even if it strays off the original topic. Nobody has to read it.

Lance said...

It's about a gig that you weren't at. By all means bring in the other points mentioned -electric bassists, soul singers whatever and I will post it as a subject for discussion - something we welcome rather than discourage - time and place being the operative. I wouldn't dream of commenting on, say, an FTQ gig that I hadn't heard before going off on a tenuously related tangent.

Warren said...

This song just took me apart Lance, I was in bits. Soulful Jazz at it's best. Originally recorded for a Quincy Jones album, written by Bernard Ighner, I believe this Oletta Adams version to be best, but Polly just took my breath away with her interpretation & SSBB arrangement/performance. It's everything I wanted HC to be in one song...Soulful, Jazzy, emotional. Thanks for the review.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDlYyjDOzko

Steve T said...

I think you've strayed from the point Lance; something I applaud. Have you never had a conversation that leads to other things. There's a famous Mingus quote where he deconstructs jazz in the nature of a conversation. Roland Barthes killed off the Author half a century ago.
You will recall when you reviewed an album by an emerging jazz singer, (who like Jean Carn(e) would turn up at Hoochie) where you opened with comments I made about jazz singers not listening to great soul singers as much as they used to. You may not have recieved my comment against that post so I'll repeat the intention here. If somebody reads it and wonders who Jean Carn(e) is, or goes out and buys an album by Linda Jones, Shirley Brown or Angie Stone, I would consider that a good thing. Isn't that what BSH is all about!

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