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Bebop Spoken There

Kenny Garrett: "I think about the past and the elders and connecting everything together, and it being as a whole, or as one." - (DownBeat, December 2021)

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.
Ann Braithwaite (Braithwaite & Katz Communications) You’re the BEST! --

Postage

14743 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 13 years ago. 1362 of them this year alone and, so far, 78 this month (Nov. 24).

From This Moment On ...

November

Sun 28 Vieux Carré Hot 4 @ Spanish City, Whitley Bay. 12 noon.
Sun 28: Musicians Unlimited @ South Durham Social Club, Hartlepool. 1:00pm.
Sun 28: More Jam @ The Globe, Newcastle. 3:00pm.
Sun 28: Alex Ord & Jude Murphy @ St Edmund's Church, Sedgefield. 3:00pm. Ord (piano), Murphy (bass).
Sun 28: Emma Johnson's Gravy Boat @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm.

Mon 29: Jazz in the Afternoon @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.

December

Wed 01: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.
Wed 01: Darlington Big Band @ Darlington & Simpson Rolling Mills Club, Darlington. 7:00pm. Rehearsal session (open to the public).
Wed 01: Jools Holland’s R & B Orchestra @ Newcastle City Hall. Doors: 6:30pm. 1st night.
Wed 01: Four @ The Exchange, North Shields. 7:00-9:30pm. In the bar.
Wed 01: Take it to the Bridge @ The Globe, Newcastle. 7:30pm.
Wed 01: Tom Ollendorff @ Café Cathedral, Owengate, Durham. 8:00pm. £5.00. A Durham Jazz Soc. event.

Thu 02: Vieux Carré Hot 4 @ Spanish City, Whitley Bay. 12 noon. £22.00. Xmas lunch. Tel: 0191 691 7090.
Thu 02: Jools Holland’s R & B Orchestra @ Newcastle City Hall. Doors: 6:30pm. 2nd night.
Thu 02: Jeremy McMurray & the Pocket Orchestra @ Billingham Catholic Club. 7:30pm. Fundraiser for SVP. Tickets: £5.00. from 07757 062798.
Thu 02: Maine Street Jazzmen @ Sunniside Social Club, Gateshead. 8:30pm.
Thu 02: Tees Hot Club, Dorman’s Club, Middlesbrough. 9:00pm.

Fri 03: Vieux Carré Hot 4 @ Spanish City, Whitley Bay. 12 noon. £22.00. Xmas lunch. Tel: 0191 691 7090.
Fri 03: Classic Swing @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.
Fri 03: New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band @ Oxbridge Hotel, Stockton. 1:00pm.
Fri 03: Rendezvous Jazz @ The Monkseaton Arms, Monkseaton. 1:00pm.
Fri 03: Classic Swing @ Saltburn Community Theatre. 7:30pm.

Sat 04: Play Jazz! Workshop @ The Globe, Newcastle. 1:30pm. Tutor: Clark Tracey. £25.00., book at: www.jazz.coop. .
Sat 04: Hot Club du Nord @ St Cuthbert’s, Hebron, nr. Morpeth. 7:30pm. Festive Special! SOLD OUT!.
Sat 04: Tyne Valley Big Band @ Greenside Community Centre, Ryton. 7:30pm. £5.00..
Sat 04: Clark Tracey Quartet @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm. £15.00. .
Sat 04: Rendezvous Jazz @ The Red Lion, Earsdon, North Tyneside. 8:00pm. £3.00. Xmas party.

Sun 05 Vieux Carré Hot 4 @ Spanish City, Whitley Bay. 12 noon.
Sun 05: Smokin’ Spitfires @ The Cluny, Newcastle. 12:45pm.
Sun 05: Musicians Unlimited @ South Durham Social Club, Hartlepool. 1:00pm.
Sun 05: Foundry Jazz Ensemble @ The Exchange, North Shields. 3:00pm.
Sun 05: Glenn Miller Orchestra UK @ Stockton Globe. 3:00pm. Ray McVay & co.
Sun 05: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ The Holystone, North Tyneside. 7:00pm.
Sun 05: Knats @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm.

Thursday, August 16, 2018

To clap or not to clap? That is the question

Applause after solos in the mid-performance of a piece has long been a tradition in jazz albeit not a tradition applauded by everyone.
In other forms of music such as grand opera applause is only given at the end of an aria when the rendition has, by general consensus, been sufficiently outstanding to merit the disruption of the show whereas, in jazz, the audience tends to clap irrespective of merit. And, if the audience doesn’t oblige, I know one bandleader that practically orders them to put their hands together and woe betide those who don’t.

The old Alex Welsh band were the first name band I encountered who used similar tactics. After a solo by one of his sidemen, Alex would exhort the crowd to ‘make him happy’ irrespective of how unhappy the player had made the audience feel although, I must confess, that I can’t recall any of the Welsh band making this listener feel unhappy. But the principle is there, after all, you don’t applaud dropped catches in cricket or missed ‘sitters’ in football.

I remember reading in an old Jazz Journal of film star Judy Holliday who, at the time was in a relationship with Gerry Mulligan, standing at the edge of the stage egging-on the audience to applaud a performance by the Mulligan Quartet at a concert in Paris.
Then there are bands who introduce the players before they’ve played a note and expect us to clap even though we have yet to hear what they can do.

And, of course, the listeners themselves fall into a host of different categories when it comes to applauding:
     1) The I can clap louder and longer than you. These are determined to have the last clap even though the rest of the audience has long since ceased to applaud.

    2) The should I or shouldn’t I clap? Terrified of being a voice in the wilderness, they wait until their neighbour takes the lead.

     3) The vocal applauder. Not content with clapping louder and longer than anyone else, this one also yells ‘Yeah man!’ or some other passé expression. This person is most frequently heard after drum solos and stratospheric trumpet choruses but never after bass solos.

     4) The strategic drinker. This one times it so that, at the moment of applause, he just happens to be picking his drink up and is therefore unable to join in the applause whilst having an excuse for not doing so.

      5) The ‘mother’ superior is of either gender and doesn’t applaud until the end of the piece (as we do at symphony concerts) but when the jazz pianist runs out of ideas and sticks in a quote from Way Down Upon the Swanee River he smiles and nods knowingly as if he’s the only person in the room who recognised those few bars.

Mind you applause can, at times, enhance the listener’s pleasure even though it doesn’t always enhance the music. The old JATP recordings wouldn’t be the same without the Rabelaisian crowd seeking blood and pushing the trumpets to play higher, the tenors to honk and squeal, the drummers to do battle. Without the crowd, the excitement would become boring.

So, at the end of the day, it’s up to you whether you applaud or not and whether you do it because the solo is worthy of it or out of common courtesy to save hurting the player’s feelings.
Lance.

1 comment :

Hugh C said...

Great piece, Lance. If there were the facility to "Like" it, I would give it a multitude of Likes!

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