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Bebop Spoken There

Jimmy Vaughan: "I don't just want to turn out stuff because I'm supposed to. I'm not a plumber. I don't want it to be just a job" - (Downbeat, August 2019)

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Monday July 22

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (See above).

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Evening

?????.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, August 10, 2018

LP Review: Thelonious Monk - MØNK

Thelonious Monk (piano); Charlie Rouse (tenor); John Ore (bass); Frankie Dunlop (drums).
(Review by Lance).
Previously unreleased recordings by Monk are always interesting and this one from a 1963 concert in Copenhagen is more than merely 'interesting' it's an absolute gem.
True, we've heard most of the pieces in the studio but, hearing them live is a totally different ballgame as this lovingly restored Gearbox release proves.

Monk is, of course, the quirky, unpredictable, musical alchemist we know and love/hate (delete as applicable) but, for me, the icing on any Monkian cake is Charlie Rouse - in effect, Monk's third arm.
Just as Johnny Hodges was never the same away from Duke, nor was Rouse as effective away from Monk.
Trane, Griffin and Rollins all played well with bebop's high priest but with Rouse, it was as if they were joined at the hip and I use the word advisedly. Rouse could interpret Monk's tunes and cope with the pianist's often clunky approach like no one else.
The tenor solos are long but never boring as he moves with serpentine agility through the changes; his sound and approach as individual as that of Monk himself.

Monk's individuality is never more apparent than on the solo performance of Body and Soul. It took me many years to fully appreciate his unique approach to the piano but, when I eventually did it was a Damascus moment. Parker and Gillespie may have been the PR men for bebop but Monk was the backroom genius, his innovations more complex than the blues and rhythm changes of the other two, great as they were.

John Ore performs the bass duties as expected and longtime Monk drummer Dunlop, like Rouse, knew Monk's music inside out.

Bye-Ya; Nutty; Monk's Dream and I'm Getting Sentimental Over You are the other pieces on this classic discovery - the original tapes, it is said, were rescued from a skip and, I quote, "faithfully restored, mastered and cut using Gearbox's legendary all-analogue process, making it a genuine AAA release (analogue recording, analogue mix, analogue master) and a treat for all audiophiles, enthusiasts, historians and music lovers alike".

Well, although I've only been working from a promo CD, I can go along with all that.
There's also, apart from the standard vinyl edition, a limited run, 500 copies only. special Collector's Edition vinyl release to be issued on a first come, first served, basis.
Yer pays yer money...

It's been a good year - Chet Baker, John Coltrane and now Monk. That Buddy Bolden cylinder might turn up yet and if it does,  Gearbox will give it the treatment!
Lance.
Available Sept.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance