Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Dave Puddy: "Eventually we paid our entrance money [to Eel Pie Island] and fought our way to one of the many bars where we could buy our Newcastle Brown and retire to the back of the heaving dancefloor. There must have been lights somewhere, but my memory remains of being in some dark cavernous wonderland." - (Just Jazz July 2020)

Dave Rempis:Ten years from now, I can see musicians streaming concerts in real time and charging a minimal amount for people to watch.” - (DownBeat September 2013)

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

Postage

11,612 (and counting) posts since we started blogging just over 12 years ago. 747 of them this year alone and, so far, 11 this month (July 3).

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.
------
Born This Day
Louis Armstrong and Steve Andrews.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

CD Review: Kristian Borring – Silent Storm

Kristian Borring (guitar), Arthur Lea (piano), Mick Coady (double bass) & Jon Scott (drums)
(Review by Russell)
Guitarist Kristian Borring’s regular working band went into the studio to record this new release on the back of a concert tour and it shows. On Silent Storm the quartet fires on all cylinders from the opening number. Borring wrote all ten tracks on the album, coming in at just under one hour. The first two numbers (When He Goes Out to Play and Ton) take no time getting into the swing of it. Borring plays with a contemporary edge whilst never losing his firm grip on the jazz guitar lexicon.
Mick Coady’s double bass playing and Jon Scott’s drumming are prominent on Ton with a sense of swing at the heart of it all. Borring’s intro to Intro to Islington Twilight gives a clear indication of the guitarist’s appreciation of the great  jazz guitar accompanists such as Jim Hall and Joe Pass. More is the pity that there is but one minute forty-five seconds of it! Islington Twilight itself moves into current groove territory.
Pianist Arthur Lea shines on the swift, swinging Cool It. Borring elects to keep out of the way, the trio swinging, latterly joining proceedings with a beautifully executed solo of his own. The title track – Silent Storm – is a masterful exposition of jazz guitar and the small jazz combo. Borring has certainly found empathetic bandmates in Lea, Coady and Scott. Drummer Scott’s brush work on Silent Storm is particularly impressive. Pianist Lea has a knack of playing the right thing at the right time, exemplified on Nosda, first soloing then comping behind bandleader Borring. Fable closes the CD. Blindfold, one could easily be playing the game of ‘name that tune’. Familiar, yet, it is, of course, a Borring composition.
Kristian Borring’s Silent Storm takes its place on the album shelves alongside recordings by Jim Hall, Barney Kessel and Joe Pass.                          
Russell.
Silent Storm by Kristian Borring is available on Jellymould Jazz (JM-JJ024).

No comments :

Blog Archive