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Monday, November 09, 2015

Tipping Point & Long Lonesome Go @ Bridge Hotel Newcastle - Nov. 8

James Mainwaring (tenor sax); Matthew Bourne (keyboards); Mick Bardon (bass); Joost Hendrickx (drums).
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Paul Taylor (keyboards); Jason Etherington (electric bass); Christian Alderson (drums)
(Review by Steve H/Photos courtesy of Ken Drew).
I’d previously seen Tipping Point at this very same venue earlier this year (reviewed here). I was impressed but not overwhelmed. How things have changed in the last 8 months, for, on Sunday night, they were little short of outstanding. All the individuals played marvellously in their own right but without resorting to set piece solos in the traditional manner. At times it was hard to decide which one of the quartet to focus on such was the skill and finesse on offer from all 4 members. 
Hendickx, cool and calculating on percussion, Bardon, fascinating on bass and Bourne, at times sounding almost ecclesiastical. All led by Skipper Mainwaring who really blew up a storm on tenor and electronics. This band though is certainly more Jazz SAS than ‘Dad’s Army’ and the old cliché about “the whole being greater than the sum of the parts is really worth trotting out again with the caveat that the individual parts were still magnificent. 
The Long Lonesome Go provided the support with their own brand of ‘quantum jazz’- by that I mean they appear to be playing in a parallel universe. The band produced a symphonic electronic soundscape hard to pigeon hole but always quirky and interesting. Their interaction with the audience is so minimal that bass player Etherington had his back to the audience for the entire set and even managed to shuffle off stage at the end without ever facing the paying public. Maybe that is part of the experience they are trying to project, but, call me old fashioned if you must, when I go and see live music it is nice to have some form of communication with those performing. I enjoyed what was produced but next time they play I might well be the Long Lonesome No Go. 
Steve H.   

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