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Bebop Spoken There

Barry Harris (in 1981): "There is not one place in the world that you can find more jazz musicians from than Detroit." - (DownBeat, September 2019).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Monday August 19

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see centre column).

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Schmazz presents the Jonathan Silk Big Band @ The Black Swan - July 28









(Review by Lance/Photos courtesy of Ken Drew.)
The ethereal, tentative, probing, opening bars confirmed, what the pre-concert blurb had hinted at, that this was to be no powerhouse "hit him in the slats Bob"* big band but more of a contemporary jazz orchestra approach. Not that it was without excitement although some wag sitting at the back, stage whispered "I thought they were still tuning up!" - he left shortly after! It was complex and cleverly arranged without seeming to have been arranged at all. Section pitted against section, not in the traditional call and response format but rather like a 20th century symphonic work whereby contrasting melodic lines complemented each other. Dissonant at times? Yes, but dissonance has come a long way since the Peanut Vendor.
The addition of tuba added extra depth, as it has done in the past with various legendary ensembles including Miles Davis, Gil Evans and John Dankworth, making for a fuller ensemble sound
Tenor saxists Fleming and Wright slugged it out, Adam Chatterton, cucumber cool on flugel, Tom McNiven blew trumpet like he does when let off the leash in the SNJO, Silk played a major part as leader, composer/arranger and drummer - he kicked off the second set with an extended solo that showed us what he could do with a pair of sticks but, in the main, contented himself with meaningful support. Guitar, keys, bass (guitar and upright) kept us in the present whilst Mikey Owers, who I'm reliably informed has replaced Ryan Quigley in Brass Jaw, excelled on trombone. Not many trumpet players could replace Quigley so for a trombonist to get the gig speaks volumes.
Talking about volumes...
The lack of microphones made many of Silk's announcements inaudible to those of us sitting in 'the gallery'.  The absence of mics also presented problems for the sax soloists - particularly when the band were riffing behind them. Baritone sax (Maddock?) the most notable casualty.
The personnel given below is what was advertised, however, Phil O'Malley played some cracking trombone solos so he too was in there sliding - clarification needed. 
A quite memorable occasion.
Lance.
John Fleming, Mike Fletcher, Adam Jackson; Chris Maddock, Joe Wright (reeds); Mike Adlington, Adam Chatterton, Matt Gough, Tom McNiven (trumpets); Richard Foote, Kieran McLeod, Mikey Owers (trombones); Andy Johnson (tuba); Tom Ford (guitar); Andy Bunting (keyboards); Nick Jurd (bass); Jonathan Silk (drums).
"Hit him in the slats Bob" the legendary instruction Mrs Fitzsimmons is reported to have shouted to her husband during Bob Fitzsimmons' world title fight with James J. Corbett which, interpreted, meant "Hit him in the guts".

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance