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Bebop Spoken There

Barry Harris (in 1981): "There is not one place in the world that you can find more jazz musicians from than Detroit." - (DownBeat, September 2019).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Saturday August 17

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see above).

Newcastle Jazz Festival - Tyne Bank Brewery, Walker Road, Newcastle NE6 2AB. Tel: 0191 265 2828. £15.00. All day event, line-up:

Zoë Gilby & Andy Champion (1:30pm)

Alan Law Trio (2:40pm)

Mark Williams Trio (3:50pm)

Emma Fisk & James Birkett (5:00pm)

(Evening)

Alexander Bone (6:15pm)

Strictly Smokin’ Big Band (7:45pm).

Blues/Funk/Soul

King Snake - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9:00pm. Free.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Saturday, November 02, 2013

Arun Ghosh Sextet @ Sage Gateshead. November 1

Arun Ghosh (clarinet), Zoe Rahman (piano), Chris Williams (alto saxophone), Liran Donin (double bass & electric bass), Nilesh Gulhane (tabla) & Pat Illingworth (drums)
(Review by Russell/Photo by Ken Drew.)
Clarinetist Arun Ghosh recently released his third album – A South Asian Suite – and to celebrate the occasion embarked on a tour with his sextet. The itinerary included a visit to Sage Gateshead. The Gem Arts promoted gig (with a little help from Jazz North East and Sage Gateshead) attracted a good number of folk – regular jazzers, world music fans, Sage patrons, in fact, anyone with an interest in great music. Ghosh, hailing from the north west of England, brought huge enthusiasm and brilliant musicianship to the party.
The sextet matched him every step of the way. The band’s rhythm section had it down from the first bar of Gypsies of Rajasthan: drummer Pat Illingworth (remembered for a commanding performance with the Spatial AKA Orchestra at Sage Gateshead) gave a master class alongside tabla maestro Nilesh Gulhane with bassist Liran Donin ‘s commitment to the project clearly evident. Tunes ranged from the elegant to the explosive. 
Virtuoso pianist Zoe Rahman is elegance personified. She never fails to captivate, communicating with band mates, picking up on the subtleties of Ghosh’s compositions with a knowing smile, reciprocated by Donin, altoist Chris Williams, Gulhane and Illingworth. Ghosh himself, immersed in the music, danced, cajoled and, quite simply, enjoyed the whole experience. His solo flights drew upon innumerable Asian influences – the music of Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka – inspired by the fishermen of great rivers (River Song) to independence celebrations across the continent (Lal Qil’ah). 
Highlights were many, one such being an exquisite Rahman piano solo followed by After the Monsoon. The devotional Sufi Stomp (Soul of Sindh) really did stomp. In concert, one noticed the Ellingtonian voicings for clarinet and alto sax on intros, often as a prelude to fearsome blowing. Arun Ghosh may be the front man but he has put together a fine band, the group sound to the fore. The Gateshead audience demanded an encore and the self deprecating Ghosh said we would end with something from the ‘hippy dippy’ era. The Beatles’ (John Lennon) Tomorrow Never Knows sent us on our way…man.                       
Russell.
(PS: Photo by Ken Drew posted by kind permission of Sage Gateshead.)

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance