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Bebop Spoken There

Jeremy Pelt: "It [Birth of the Cool sessions] was bebop in sheep's clothing." - (DownBeat, December 2019).

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Today Tuesday November 12

Afternoon

Jazz

Classic Swing - The Ship Inn, Front Street, Monkseaton NE25 8DP. 0191 251 3677. 1:00pm - 3:00pm. Free.

Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool - Tyneside Cinema, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle NE1 6QG. Tel: 0191 227 5500. 1:15pm. Stanley Nelson's 2019 documentary film.

Evening

Jazz

Not Now Charlie - Fox Inn, West End Terrace, Hexham NE46 3DB.Tel: 01434 603681. 8:30pm. Free (donations).

Blues

Sugaray Rayford - Cluny, Lime St., Newcastle NE1 2PQ. Tel 0191 230 4474. 8:00pm. £15.00.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Sunday, August 18, 2019

Newcastle Jazz Festival @ Tyne Bank Brewery - August 17

(Review by Lance/Photos of musicians courtesy of Malcolm Sinclair - LINK).

A Newcastle Jazz Festival - what's not to like? I'm fortunate, or maybe unfortunate, to be old enough to remember the fantastic festivals organised by my dear friend Andy Hudson where Art Pepper, George Melly, Barney Kessel and many others graced the then University Theatre. Those were indeed halcyon days but, to compare today's festival with those that took place  back then - as has been done elsewhere - defeats the object entirely.

Although without the clout of previous big name sponsors it could, nevertheless,  be argued that on a pound for pound basis this matched any festival - either side of the river.


Like all great festivals there was something for everyone and the only folk leaving were those who nipped out to the pizza pop-ups outside - they came back - our mouths were watering until we too succumbed! 

But, what am I doing rambling on about pizza? My friend is allergic to cheese! "No problem madam, we can serve without cheese."

A pizza without cheese may sound like Romeo without Juliet or Bonnie without Clyde but, take it from me - from now on cheese is off the menu when it comes to having a pizza.

The music. I don't know if it was the acoustics, but this barn like structure didn't do any harm at all and Zoë Gilby in her duo set with Andy Champion sounded fantastic. Our girl is nominated in the Jazz Vocal Cat. of this year's APPJAG awards - nip down to the bookies and put a couple of quid on but don't double it with Toon winning the Premier League.

The Alan Law Trio followed. Perhaps the most underrated jazz piano man on Tyneside, Alan has the edge on so many of his contemporaries - dynamics! He can take a piece from ppp to fff and return it once his point has been made, Crescendo and Diminuendo are his middle names!

Contrast is what makes any festival and the Mark Williams Trio certainly upped the ante in that respect. This wasn't Walker - it was Woodstock Forty Years After! Alvin Lee, Black Sabbath, Williams, Walker (Rob) and Pope.


Did I say contrast? With Emma Fisk and James Birkett you got it! Anyone who thought the 1920s' swing of Emma and James might pall after the heavy metal thrash of the previous set soon dismissed those thoughts - A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square - maybe the highlight of the afternoon - maybe - when you open a box of chocolates can you make such a decision? Suffice to say that Emma and James weren't the coffee creams but the ones you grab first - apologies to those who like coffee creams!

Could anyone follow this? Back in the old days it may have been Ronnie Scott or James Moody but, with those two sax aces being taken suddenly dead it was left to Alexander Bone to rise to the challenge and, as he was the inaugural winner of the BBC Jazz Musician of the Year award, I could think of none better. He didn't fail. With the audience in mind, he made no attempt to push the boundaries but played driving hard bop alto. A guy sitting at a nearby table wore a Blue Note tee shirt - he must have gone home a happy man! Dean Stockdale, Mick Shoulder and Matt MacKellar - what a back three! YouTube clip from James Nesbitt.

Special mention also to the heroes of the hour. Michael Lamb and Jamie Toms took to the stage with Strictly Smokin' Big Band and, even if they hadn't blown a note they would have received a standing ovation just for promoting this well-organised event. As it turned out, the whole band gave the audience a 'standing ovation' - the crowd had commandeered all the chairs so that with the exception of piano and drums the band stood. It didn't effect the playing or the vocals from Alice Grace. This was a fitting end to what had been a great day - roll on next year.

I've attached a couple of crowd shots taken in between sets just to give an idea of the occasion.
Lance.
PS: as I left after the penultimate set - having perhaps taken my bucket to the well once too often - the sad thought that crossed my mind was how much the late Margaret Barnes would have loved this memorable day...

Link to photos by Malcolm Sinclair.

Zoë Gilby (vocals); Andy Champion (double bass).

Alan Law (piano); Paul Grainger (double bass); Rob Walker (drums).

Mark Williams (guitar); John Pope (bass guitar); Russ Morgan (drums).

Emma Fisk (violin); James Birkett (guitar).

Alexander Bone (alto sax); Dean Stockdale (piano); Mick Shoulder (double bass); Matt MacKellar (drums).

Michael Lamb (MD), Pete Tanton, Gordon Marshall, Dick Stacey (trumpets); John Flood Kieran Parnaby, Chris Kurgi-Smith, Mark Ferris (trombones); Steve Summers, Niall Armstrong, Jamie Toms,  Dave Kerridge, Laurie Rangecroft (reeds); Graham Don (piano); Pawel Jedrzejewski (guitar); Michael Whent (bass guitar); Guy Swinton (drums); Alice Grace (vocals).

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance