Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Stewart Copeland: "The group [Last Exit] was dire. They'd do these really jazzy numbers that started with little swishes on the piano or the cymbals...."

- (Melody Maker September 22, 1979)

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

Postage

11,810 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 12 years ago. 1050of them this year alone and, so far, 77 this month (Sept. 29).

Coming soon ...

IT IS ADVISABLE TO CHECK IN ADVANCE WITH THE VENUE THAT THE GIG IS ON.

OCTOBER

THURSDAY 1

Vieux Carre Jazzmen - The Holystone, Whitley Road, North Tyneside NE27 0DA. 0191 266 6173. 1:00pm. Free.

-----

Maine St Jazzmen - Sunniside Social Club, Sunniside Road, Sunniside NE16 5NA. Tel: 0191 488 7347. 8:00 -10:00pm. Free. Note earlier start/finish. CANCELLED! Back on October 8

Smoove & Turrell (Unplugged) - Hoochie Coochie, Pilgrim St., Newcastle NE1 6SF. Tel: 0191 222 0130. 7:00pm (6:00pm doors). £25.00. Limited capacity, book at www.hoochiecoochie.co.uk.

FRIDAY 2

Smoove & Turrell (Unplugged) - Hoochie Coochie, Pilgrim St., Newcastle NE1 6SF. Tel: 0191 222 0130. 7:00pm (6:00pm doors). £25.00. Limited capacity, book at www.hoochiecoochie.co.uk. SOLD OUT!

Lee Bates - Prohibition Bar, Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 8:00pm-10:00pm. Free (donations). Limited capacity. A Blind Pig Blues Club event.

SATURDAY 3

Emma Wilson Blues Band - The Globe, Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7DN. 8:00pm. Limited capacity, in the first instance register for the live stream (£5.45.) at: www.jazzcoop.

SUNDAY 4

Vieux Carre Hot 4 - Spanish City, Spanish City Plaza, Whitley Bay NE26 1BG. 12 noon. Tel: 0191 691 7090. Free.

Gerry Richardson Quintet - The Globe, Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7DN. 8:00pm. Limited capacity, in the first instance register for the live stream (£5.45.) at: www.jazzcoop. The band’s 25th anniversary celebrations!

Sunday, November 01, 2015

Buck Clayton Legacy Band @Sage Gateshead – a postscript

(Review by Hugh C).
Following Russell's excellent (and accurate) review I would like to add my two penn'orth (1/21st of Three and Six if my maths is correct!).
The brave few ventured forth on the Saturday morning following to attend the Buck Clayton Legacy Band Workshop.   We duly arrived and were ready and waiting (watches synchronised) outside the Northern Rock Foundation Hall at 0955h sharp.  After a while one of the Sage Gatehsead stewards arrived and seemed surprised to find the the tickets we eagerly proffered clearly bore the words Start Time:  10:00 AM.  The band apparently were under the impression that the workshop commenced at 10:30 AM!  One disgruntled punter muttered the word ridiculous, but, hey man – that's Jazz!
The upside was we had time to grab a coffee to take in.  As we entered the Hall the band's instruments were already laid out on their stands ready.  The full line-up from Friday night were there by 1020, no-one looked the worse for wear, although the trombonist, Adrian Fry, did try and blame a lapse of memory during the morning on the earliness of the hour!
The workshop commenced with a rousing rendition of Cotton Tail.  The next musical item was Take the A Train – the first part in the arrangement used in the Friday gig and the second part straight.  The overall format of the morning was music/talk/music....  Alyn Shipton gave a brief introduction as to why the Buck Clayton Legacy Band were playing Duke Ellington (one of the reasons was that Buck and Duke were long-time friends, and indeed Duke Ellington was best man at Buck's wedding).  Each of the Legacy Band musicians was then asked to paint a word picture of the Ellington Band musicians who would have played their instrument(s).  Some of these pictures took the form of a question and answer dialogue between the band members.  The result was a fascinating insight into the history and practice of the Ellington Band and the approach that 21st Century musicians took to this music. 
The next musical item was an illustration of a contrafact - a term apparently only recently introduced to the remainder of the band by Alan Barnes.  A contrafact is a musical composition consisting of a new melody overlaid on a familiar harmonic structure (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contrafact) and was beautfully illustrated by playing Johnny Hodges' Shady Side (as on the Friday evening), but this time  preceded by a short extract from On The Sunny Side of the Street.
When the time came for Bobby Worth (the self-declared oldest member of the band) to talk drummers he revealed the ace up his sleeve.  Bobby had actually seen the Ellington band play on two separate occasions in London. 
The morning was a tour de force, both on the part of the band themselves and the audience who numbered as many as a cricket team, but were richly rewarded and also contributed themselves to an informed and interesting discussion during the workshop.
The band (as we were informed on several occasions) had a gig to get to in Maidstone the same evening and were keen to get on the road.  An invited audience request of Mood Indigo provided an illustrative Ellingtonian ballad (exquisitely played) followed the band's choice of the more up-tempo Rockin' in Rhythm for a finale.
All in all an excellent combination – and congratulations to Ros Rigby and the Sage for programming these two events.  It's a shame that there was not a larger audience for the workshop, but this was more than made up for by the near sell-out attendance the evening before.
Hugh.

No comments :

Blog Archive