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Bebop Spoken There

John Medeski: "Like Mingus or Ellington, he [John Zorn] pulls people out of their zones and encourages them to do more than they would do on their own." - (DownBeat, December 2018).

Today Tuesday November 20

Afternoon

Classic Swing - The Ship, Front St., Monkseaton NE25 8DP. 1pm. Free.

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

CD Review: Rachel Caswell - We’re All In The Dance

Rachel Caswell (vocals); Sara Caswell (violin tracks 1,3,5); Dave Stryker (guitar, arrangements); Fabian Almazan (piano, Fender Rhodes); Linda May Han Oh (bass); Johnathan Blake (drums).
(Review by Ann Alex)

Rachel Caswell comes from a musical Indiana family. At 13, she had begun to play jazz piano and cello, and, encouraged by a family friend, to sing scat and bebop. In 2015, she gave up her day job to concentrate on music, and this is her second album. We’re All In The Dance consists of re-imagined standards plus Sting’s Fragile. This is a very enjoyable CD which includes stellar instrumental playing with lots of solos.
The vocals are pleasing, though I would have liked a bit less scatting, but perhaps that is my preference rather than an objective opinion. I’m not a great one for scat unless it is exceptionally good and comes across as an integral part of the song.

The songs are: Fragile; A Lovely Way To Spend An Evening; We’re All In The Dance; Devil May Care; Two For The Road; Drown In My Own Tears; I Didn’t Know What Time It Was; Tell Me A Bedtime Story; Dexterity: Reflections (Looking Back)

Fragile has a very suitable, haunting violin solo and sung wordplay to round off the piece, which works better than scat; A Lovely Way To Spend An Evening is a romantic swinger; Devil May Care is one of the best tracks, sung freely at first, lots of effective cymbal work from the drums, and a bass solo with just odd notes from the other instruments; Drown In My Own Tears is slow and bluesy; I Didn’t Know What Time It Was literally plays with the timing, with clever phrasing by the pianist; Tell Me A Bedtime Story gives us a suitably smooth, warm, Fender Rhodes solo; Dexterity shows our singer thoroughly at home with beboppy scat; Hendricks/Monk’s Reflections is quietly bittersweet.

The CD was released on September 7 by Turtle Ridge Records (TRR-003).
Ann Alex    

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
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