Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Maurice J. Summerfield: "Over dinner one night Barney [Kessel] told me about his seminar The Effective Guitarist, and in 1972 my company presented the first of twelve annual UK seminars in Newcastle upon Tyne." - (Just Jazz Guitar, September 1997)

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.

Ann Braithwaite (Braithwaite & Katz Communications) You’re the BEST!

Holly Cooper, Mouthpiece Music: "Lance writes pull quotes like no one else!"

Postage

15087 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 15 years ago. 106 of them this year alone and, so far, 4 this month (Feb. 1).

From This Moment On ...

February

Thu 02: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ The Holystone, Whitley Road, North Tyneside. 1:00pm. Free.
Thu 02: Gateshead Jazz Appreciation Society @ Gateshead Central Library. 2:30-4:30pm. £1.00. All welcome.
Thu 02: Paul Skerritt Duo @ Tomahawk Steakhouse, High St., Yarm. 8:00pm.
Thu 02: Tees Hot Club @ Dorman's Club, Middlesbrough. 9:00pm. Guests: Dave Archbold (keys); Josh Bentham (tenor sax); Donna Hewwitt (alto sax); Adrian Beadnell (bass).

Fri 03: Classic Swing @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.
Fri 03: New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band @ Oxbridge Hotel, Stockton. 1:00pm. £5.00.
Fri 03: Rendezvous Jazz @ The Monkseaton Arms, Monkseaton. 1:00pm.
Fri 03: Abbie Finn Trio @ Saltburn Community Hall. 7:30pm.
Fri 03: Dilutey Juice @ Bobik's, Punch Bowl, Newcastle. 7:30pm.
Fri 03: Smoove & Turrell @ Hoochie Coochie, Newcastle. 7:30pm (doors). £25.00.
Fri 03: Struggle Buggy @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 8:00pm. Blind Pig Blues Club.

Sat 04: Alligator Gumbo @ St Augustine's Parish Centre, Darlington. 12:30pm.
Sat 04: Play Jazz! workshop @ The Globe, Newcastle. 1:30pm. Tutor: John Pope - Up Your Rhythm Game. £25.00. Enrol at: www.jazz.coop.
Sat 04: King Bees @ Grainger Market, Newcastle. 6:30pm (doors). Live music, comedy, DJs, food stalls. £10.00. advance, £15.00. on the door. Blues band King Bees on stage 9:45-11:15pm. A Great Market Caper event.
Sat 04: Jives Aces @ The Witham, Barnard Castle. 7:30pm.
Sat 04: Renegade Brass Band @ The Cluny, Newcastle. 7:30pm (doors).
Sat 04: Rendezvous Jazz @ Red Lion, Earsdon. 8:00pm. £3.00.

Sun 05 Vieux Carré Hot 4 @ Spanish City, Whitley Bay. 12 noon.
Sun 05: Rivkala @ Cumberland Arms, Newcastle. 6:00pm.
Sun 05: Jive Aces @ Fire Station, Sunderland. 7:30pm.
Sun 05: Dale Storr @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm.

Sun 05: Jam No.13 @ Fabio's, Saddler St., Durham. Free. Durham University Jazz Society jam session. All welcome (students & non-students alike).

Mon 06: Harmony Brass @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.

Tue 07: Jam session @ Black Swan, Newcastle Arts Centre. 7:30pm. House trio: Alan Law (piano); Paul Grainger (double bass); Rob Walker (drums). Jam session reverts to a first & third Tuesday in the month schedule.

Wed 08: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.
Wed 08: Jam session @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 1:00pm. Free. TBC.
Wed 08: Darlington Big Band @ Darlington & Simpson Rolling Mills Social Club, Darlington. 7:00pm. Rehearsal session (open to the public).
Wed 08: 4B @ The Exchange, North Shields. 7:00pm.
Wed 08: Take it to the Bridge @ The Globe, Newcastle. 7:30pm.

Sunday, January 29, 2017

New Year New Artists @Sage Gateshead. January 29 Saturday Afternoon Session

(Review by Steve T)
The Elliott Galvin Trio was the main attraction for the Jazz fan. I'm a self-confessed philistine when it comes to piano trios but there's been a definite move towards equal weight for each musician in recent years. I vaguely recall similar claims when I first started listening to 'real' Jazz in the early eighties but I still remember relentless bass solos, so maybe it's like the folk revival. On the other hand, in bands like Bad Plus, GoGo Penguin and these, maybe it's really starting to happen.
If I'm honest I found it a little gimmicky, not least the final piece which began with Punch and Judy being played and replayed on an old cassette (the cool persons equivalent to vinyl, allegedly) and ended with a recording of the police arriving to arrest them.
Along the way there was some fine Jazz and some fantastic musicianship, as you'd expect, but with many non-Jazzers in the audience, I wouldn't want them  to think it's novelty music. 
A pleasant surprise as I arrived was to find a table alongside sitar virtuoso Jasdeep Singh Degun, although he only featured on one of the two extended pieces. I don't mind small doses of sitar (editor: baby sitar?) but, for me, the real appeal of Indian music is the percussion instrument that, I always say, makes a poing sound. The Family T have been threatening to invest in a pair for me for years but they're a bit expensive and require some TLC, which I'm not renowned for.
Probably the set of the day for me, rewarded with rapturous applause from a more or less full level one. 
As I sat awaiting the next concert a lady next to me was directing a chap to an Indian restaurant. I was having similar thoughts, so job well done.
My interest in classical music is largely restricted to ten or twelve composers, Debussy - featured twice during the day - being one of them, and played by at least a string quartet, but preferably a large orchestra with lashings of strings. My plan was to sit next to the exit for a quick getaway after the first piece, but were scuppered right off by uncertainty over parking, so I only got a few minutes.
The good news for the philistines, with only a minimal interest in classical music, was that they each played the concourse, which for me was better than the Northern Rock Foundation Hall, and clarinettist Horacio Ferreira, accompanied by a pianist, sounded Jazzier and more lively in a less formal setting.
Like just about every other style you can think of, folk is cool again, if in the anti-cool way folkies prefer. It's currently going through something of a perpetual revival that's been going on since the fifties at least.
I've never been much of a fan though I've come round to some folk-rock and some North East stuff. The accordion is something of a no go but in Talisk it worked really well, flanked by acoustic guitar and fiddle.
The set was entirely instrumental and really kicked in when each tune burst into a jig, complete with foot-stomping, whooping, yeehaing, clapping and the fiddlers elbow going like - well, a fiddlers elbow. At the end of the afternoon I heard a young lad ask his dad which concert he'd enjoyed the most and he answered Talisk and I'm sure many of the audience, now spilling over to level two, would agree.
I managed to catch pianist Mariam Batsashvili's first piece in its entirety, but the discovery of Lord Paul and Jambone in da house meant my final visit to the classical room for some Debussy was aborted.
The afternoon was a big success with the classical events at capacity and good crowds in Sage Two, I'm guessing, in no small part due to open-minded classical people, which is great. The afore-mentioned curry and back for the evening session.
Steve T.

3 comments :

Stewartd said...

Erm...Talisk weren't playing an accordion, it was a concertina, of local lad Alistair Anderson fame........
But as a jazz fan who went mainly for Elliot Galvin, having sat alongside Laura Jurd and seen him at Foyle's Bookshop in the 2015 LJF, I was actually converted to classical music by the staggeringly expressive virtuosity of Mariam Batsashvili and Tamsin Waley-Cohen.
All in all the afternoon was superb value for the £12.90!

steve T said...

Concertina, accordion, banjo, kazoo. The speed of finger was very impressive, but I will continue to avoid albums or concerts featuring a concertina or accordion.
Sadly I missed Tamsin but saw Maiam do Bach, not a composer who interests me. Zappa used to call classical musicians 'robots' and many Jazz musicians point out that they can't generally improvise. She was certainly impressive but being an impressive musician in itself does not great music make. Post punk-rock, musicianship was largely scorned for about 3 decades. I recall a lady saying on that terrible Danny Baker programme that people don't like John McLaughlin because he's too good.
It's when they start shaking their heads about like there's something going on that isn't, that I switch off; violinists tend to be ther worst.

Steve T said...

Kate Mossman. I'm not clever enough to google a name without losing the screen I'm on. She writes for - I think - the Spectator. Not just John McLaughlin but Zappa, Genesis and Coliseum. I can almost forgive her for Queen.

Blog Archive