Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Dave Puddy: "Eventually we paid our entrance money [to Eel Pie Island] and fought our way to one of the many bars where we could buy our Newcastle Brown and retire to the back of the heaving dancefloor. There must have been lights somewhere, but my memory remains of being in some dark cavernous wonderland." - (Just Jazz July 2020)

Dave Rempis:Ten years from now, I can see musicians streaming concerts in real time and charging a minimal amount for people to watch.” - (DownBeat September 2013)

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

Postage

11,600 (and counting) posts since we started blogging just over 12 years ago. 735 of them this year alone and, so far, 3 this month (July 1).

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Monday, October 31, 2016

Hannabiell and Midnight Blue @ Trimdon Colliery and Deaf Hill Working Mens Club October 30

Hannabiell Sanders (trombone, percussion), Mercedes Philips (sax, percussion), Luke Gaul (guitar), James Robson (bass), Joe Hawke (drums), Yilis Suriel (percussion), Mark Barfoot (percussion).
(Review by Steve T)
Sunday nights in out of the way places seem to be becoming as commonplace as elongated reviews, swipes at mass media pop icons and imbibing, a splendid word that's slipped into my own personal parole, courtesy Mr Edis senior.
The Trimdons: Village, Colliery and Station are part of the old coal-mining community in County Durham and this was the closing event of Trimfest, an eleven-day 'celebration of art, music and cultures from across the world', funded by Gem Arts and the lottery.
The club official who introduced the band guessed we weren't in for Whiskey in the Jar - only from the bar - but promised 'Afro-Caribbean and Latin percussion, Jazz, Afro-beat and reggae' wondering out loud 'God knows what that is'.
Stage cluttered with more percussion than Keith Moon had onstage completely out of his reach (oops, there I go again), part of a hefty rhythm section with a guitar uncompromisingly set to 'heavy'.
A lively, chatty, charismatic leader, seriously impressive on trombone and percussion, and an amazing saxophonist with real feel for Jazz, repeated solos never becoming boring, great horn section work with the leader and terrific exchanges with the guitar.
It could have slipped into 'streets of brass' but never did, because of the level of musicianship, including people who know how to play percussion and aren't just banging away at something while resting their first instrument, solid fusion style bass and Santanaesque guitar.
Featuring all original material, the highlight for me was Pacos Funk.
Wah wah guitar, Mark Barfoot slapping his djembe like ' Master' Henry Gibson with Curtis Mayfield, pumping hot bass-line, horns in unison then sax slipped into solo, 'Master' Mark upping the pressure, guitar solo continuing a tradition of rock guitar in funk going back to Eddie Hazel (Funkadelic), Ernie Isley and Drac (Slave).
The horns came back in behind the solo, the whole band 'cookin' and the audience of well over forty 100% attentive, clapping along and cheering and whooping at the end.
They're a multi-cultural, multi-ethnic band, mostly former students of Newcastle University and led by the ever energetic Hannabiell, with a PHD in Protest Culturewhich gives their album its name.
As multi-culturalism seeps through the farthest reaches of Britain, expect to see them at the most unlikely places. She's on a mission to save the world with music and who's to say she won't succeed.
Steve T.



No comments :

Blog Archive