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Bebop Spoken There

Guy Barker: "You have to play it [the trumpet] every day or you just won't be match-fit." - (Jazz Rag, Winter 2019.)

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Today Friday December 13

Afternoon

Jazz

Vieux CarréJazzmen - Spanish City, Spanish City Plaza, Whitley Bay NE26 1BG. 12 noon. ‘Christmas Jazz Lunch’. Details from 0191 252 9429).

Dean Stockdale Trio - The Merry Monk, 30 Market Place, Bishop Auckland DL14 7NP. 1:00pm. £5.00.

Rendezvous Jazz - Monkseaton Arms, Front Street, Monkseaton NE25 8DP. Tel: 0191 251 3928. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening.

Jazz

‘An Evening of Swing & Sparkle’ - National Glass Centre, Liberty Way, Sunderland SR6 0GL. Tel: 0191 515 5555. 7:30pm. £35.00. Rat Pack evening inc. 4-course meal.

Strictly Smokin’ Big Band - Gosforth Civic Theatre, Regents Farm Road, Gosforth, Newcastle NE3 3HD. Tel: 0191 284 3700. 8:00pm. £12.00. + bf. First night of two.

Chris Dean's Syd Lawrence Orchestra - Yarm School, Stockton TS15 9EJ. Tel: 01642 786023. 7:30pm (6:30pm doors). £18.00. + £1.80. bf (£15.00. + £1.50. bf). 'Mistletoe & Miller'.

Blues, Funk/Soul etc.

Baghdaddies - Cobalt Studios, Boyd Street, NewcastleNE2 1AP. £10.68 (inc. bf). ‘Big Xmas Knees Up’.

Swamp Hoppers - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9pm. Free.

George Shovlin & the Acoustic Radars feat. Pat Rafferty + George Pallas & John Wilkins - Whitburn Cricket Club, East Street, Whitburn SR6 7BZ. Tel: 0191 529 3187. 7:30pm (7:00pm doors). £7.50. admission by ticket only (from www.wegottickets.com). 'The Bents Road Sessions'.

Dead Skunk Skiffle & Blues Orchestra + Stetson Five - Station East, Hills Street, Gateshead NE8 2AN. 8:00pm. Free.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, May 15, 2015

R.I.P. BB King

BB King died yesterday (May 14) in Las Vegas - he was 89.
Guitarist, singer, icon, BB was one of the few who crossed the genres and was loved by all. Primarily a bluesman, he also moved in rock and roll circles as well as being not unknown amongst the jazz fraternity.
I saw him live at the North Sea Jazz Festival at the Hague back in the 1980s but my biggest memory was at the same festival when I didn't see him but most certainly heard him.
It was a hot July day and BB was performing inside a marque. All tickets were sold but, by sitting on a grassy knoll outside (a bit like Henman Hill or Murray Mound at Wimbledon), the sound came across loud and clear. A glass of bessenjenever (a Dutch blackcurrent gin), a plate of Maatjesharing (pickled raw herring) and the greatest blues singing of the later 20th century was as near to Shangri-la as I've known.
May he Rest In Peace.
Lance.
(Photo courtesy of Andy Hudson - see comments - taken at Capital Jazz Festival)

2 comments :

Andy Hudson said...

Very sad ref BB King- One of the last of the legends that I had the privilege of working with in the 70s and 80s. He was always the perfect gentleman and an efficient ultimate artiste, non-fussy , non-demanding , no whinges about riders or any such nonsense.

He just hit the stage with his trusty “Lucille” and played and sang (Lucille of course being the guitar –for aficionados was originally a Gibson L-30 – This morphed over time so that Gibson eventually produced their own “Lucille” model for general release).

When I left the North East in 79, after producing that Middlesbrough Jazz event at Ayresome Park, He was a headliner in the first Alexandra Palace Jazz Festival along with Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry, Hampton, Dizzy and many more. He continued to be a regular in our festivals into the 90s. Always a joy to work with, watch and listen to. Will be much missed

Maurice Summerfield said...

In his autobiography B.B. King talks about his favourite guitarists and says - for example 'Id listen to records by Barney Kessel, the great jazz guitarist who played at many Jazz at the Philharmonic concerts, and my jaw would drop. I was awe struck by the structure of his ad-libs. He had the gift of being complicated and simple at the same time. His amplified voice on guitar had a calm beauty that felt like poetry. I followed Barney Kessel's musical stories like a kid following a fairy-tale.