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Bebop Spoken There

Maurice J. Summerfield: "Over dinner one night Barney [Kessel] told me about his seminar The Effective Guitarist, and in 1972 my company presented the first of twelve annual UK seminars in Newcastle upon Tyne." - (Just Jazz Guitar, September 1997)

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

'606' Club: "A toast to Lance Liddle of the terrific jazz blog 'Bebop Spoken Here'"

The Strictly Smokin' Big Band included Be Bop Spoken Here (sic) in their 5 Favourite Jazz Blogs.

Ann Braithwaite (Braithwaite & Katz Communications) You’re the BEST!

Holly Cooper, Mouthpiece Music: "Lance writes pull quotes like no one else!"

Postage

15087 (and counting) posts since we started blogging 15 years ago. 106 of them this year alone and, so far, 4 this month (Feb. 1).

From This Moment On ...

February

Sat 04: Alligator Gumbo @ St Augustine's Parish Centre, Darlington. 12:30pm.
Sat 04: Play Jazz! workshop @ The Globe, Newcastle. 1:30pm. Tutor: John Pope - Up Your Rhythm Game. £25.00. Enrol at: www.jazz.coop.
Sat 04: King Bees @ Grainger Market, Newcastle. 6:30pm (doors). Live music, comedy, DJs, food stalls. £10.00. advance, £15.00. on the door. Blues band King Bees on stage 9:45-11:15pm. A Great Market Caper event.
Sat 04: Jives Aces @ The Witham, Barnard Castle. 7:30pm.
Sat 04: Renegade Brass Band @ The Cluny, Newcastle. 7:30pm (doors).
Sat 04: Rendezvous Jazz @ Red Lion, Earsdon. 8:00pm. £3.00.

Sun 05 Vieux Carré Hot 4 @ Spanish City, Whitley Bay. 12 noon.
Sun 05: Rivkala @ Cumberland Arms, Newcastle. 6:00pm.
Sun 05: Jive Aces @ Fire Station, Sunderland. 7:30pm.
Sun 05: Dale Storr @ The Globe, Newcastle. 8:00pm.

Sun 05: Jam No.13 @ Fabio's, Saddler St., Durham. Free. Durham University Jazz Society jam session. All welcome (students & non-students alike).

Mon 06: Harmony Brass @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.

Tue 07: Jam session @ Black Swan, Newcastle Arts Centre. 7:30pm. House trio: Alan Law (piano); Paul Grainger (double bass); Rob Walker (drums). Jam session reverts to a first & third Tuesday in the month schedule.

Wed 08: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.
Wed 08: Jam session @ Prohibition Bar, Newcastle. 1:00pm. Free. TBC.
Wed 08: Darlington Big Band @ Darlington & Simpson Rolling Mills Social Club, Darlington. 7:00pm. Rehearsal session (open to the public).
Wed 08: 4B @ The Exchange, North Shields. 7:00pm.
Wed 08: Take it to the Bridge @ The Globe, Newcastle. 7:30pm.

Thu 09: Vieux Carré Jazzmen @ The Holystone, Whitley Road, North Tyneside. 4:00pm (this week only). Free.
Thu 09: Indigo Jazz Voices @ The Globe, Newcastle. 7:45pm. £5.00.
Thu 09: Tees Hot Club @ Dorman's Club, Middlesbrough. 9:00pm.

Fri 10: Alan Barnes w Dean Stockdale Trio @ Bishop Auckland Town Hall. 1:00pm. £7.00. SOLD OUT!
Fri 10: Classic Swing @ Cullercoats Crescent Club. 1:00pm.
Fri 10: New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band @ Oxbridge Hotel, Stockton. 1:00pm. £5.00.
Fri 10: Rendezvous Jazz @ The Monkseaton Arms, Monkseaton. 1:00pm.
Fri 10: Alan Barnes w Dean Stockdale Trio @ Traveller's Rest, Darlington. 8:00pm. £12.00.

Monday, April 06, 2015

Tom Harrison Quartet @ The Bridge Hotel Newcastle - Easter Sunday

Tom Harrison (alt); Jamil Sheriff (pno); Simon Read (bs); David Lyttle (dms).
(Review by Lance/photos courtesy of Ken Drew).
It's Derby Day and Newcastle have now lost five in a row - let's drown our sorrows seems to be the prevalent mood as the 27 bus cautiously makes it's way towards the Bridge Hotel expertly avoiding the bodies bestrewn across Grainger St.
Upstairs at the venue it's quieter as the punters have yet to arrive and it takes them awhile to do so. However, we eventually get a quorum and The Tom Harrison Quartet lifts off.
This is the proverbial breath of fresh air. To hear tunes you actually know rather than originals that will probably never be heard again gives the band a head start with me. I know there are others who will disagree even though the actual improvisations were as complex as any of the "I wrote this tune in the bath last night" variations so beloved by many of today's emerging jazz musicians.
Harrison successfully incorporates facets of the great modern alto players such as Bird, Cannonball, Ornette and Dolphy welding them into a distinctive style of his own. Sheriff, no stranger to Tyneside is very much the thinking man's pianist producing rich and at times unusual harmonic variations,
Read, a composer and leader in his own right (write?), slots in perfectly soloing effectively without flamboyance.
Drummer Lyttle, by contrast, is flamboyance personified - sartorially speaking, he could be Sky Masterson from Guys and Dolls! This panache is magnified after he mounts the drum throne. The most original stickman I've seen/heard yet and I've seen them all!
Hand drumming, sticks, brushes, sometimes a combination of all three, plus various items of percussion such as shakers, triangle, tambourine, drinking glass and God knows what else!
And all without missing a beat!
April in Paris; How Deep is the Ocean (Jamil feature); Body and Soul (melodic bass solo); Blue Daniel - This Cannonball Adderley tune has special memories for me bringing to mind Sunday night's at the Rex Hotel, Whitley Bay, back in the 1960's when Sid Warren used to play it quite often. I think both Cannonball and Sid would have liked this version!
I'll Be Seeing You features Lyttle who plays an extended intro/solo to this most unlikely of numbers.
Break time.
Down in the bar a heated (an understatement!) debate is taking place - not football or even jazz but politics. The language is colourful, the air distinctly blue, so I retire before the furniture starts flying.
Skylark; Stella by Starlight and Wayne Shorter's Mahjong comprise the second set and the downstairs shenanigans are consigned to history .
If this isn't my Gig of the Month it will only be because of the heavyweights slugging it out at next weekend's GIJF!
Lance.
PS: Ken Drew explains this third photo...
After the session, just as the band were starting to pack away their instruments, Jamil sat at the drums and had a quick practice session. Not to be outdone, Dave picked up the double bass, Simon sat at the keys, and Tom swapped with Jamil for a mini Jam.  What a great way to end a session !!!

3 comments :

JC said...

A great gig with very good musicians. The drummer was fantastic but Sky Masterson, surely not? He and the band are much hipper than that. He's a dead ringer for William Burroughs - what does he wear for lunch, I wonder?

JC

Paul Bream said...

At the end of this gig I said to Tom Harrison "If I'd seen your set list in advance, I might have gone home". I'm glad I didn't - this was a superb example of how much interesting and original music can still be wrung from familiar standards.
But unlike Lance, who appears to be in love with the tunes per se regardless of how clichéd the interpretation, I revere them as launch pads for creative endeavour, which is exactly what we got from Tom and his fellow musicians. So my objection to most bands who play only standards is not the familiarity of the tunes themselves, but the all too familiar way in which they are handled.
As to Lance's dismissive attitude to original compositions, I find that not only tediously conservative, but actually quite offensive towards most of the adventurous young jazz musicians whom I encounter and who think long and hard about the music they write. The tunes they devise may not be the sort you can hum on the way home, but as vehicles for improvisation they often serve their purpose superbly - and isn't improvisation, "the sound of surprise", the very thing that makes jazz such an endlessly exciting music?
I've been listening to and loving jazz for well over 50 years, but the very things that attracted me to it in the first place - the unexpected curlicue of creativity, the "Wow! I didn't expect that!" moment - are what I still hope to find at every gig I attend. I certainly found it with the Tom Harrison Quartet, but I know that I'll also find it when the Corey Mwamba Trio comes to the Bridge in a couple of weeks time, and there won't be a standard in sight.

Lance said...

Yes Paul, I am in love with the Great American Song Book - though not, as you claim, per se. Indeed there were probably many more mediocre songs written and thankfully forgotten than those that have stood the test of time. However, a good tune with a well crafted lyric has long been the staple diet of jazz artists who, like the Tom Harrison Quartet are, as you say, a "superb example of how much interesting and original music can still be wrung from familiar standards".
My dismissive attitude to original compositions certainly isn't intended to be offensive to young composers. Just as some standards have been done to death, conversely most originals don't get done at all other than by the composer and I find it sad that so much time and effort goes into writing something that may well be an outstanding work yet is never heard again other than by the same performer.. I'd like to hear the same composition played in a different context say by a different band. Perhaps if musicians supported each other's gigs this might happen!

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