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Bebop Spoken There

Dave Puddy: "Eventually we paid our entrance money [to Eel Pie Island] and fought our way to one of the many bars where we could buy our Newcastle Brown and retire to the back of the heaving dancefloor. There must have been lights somewhere, but my memory remains of being in some dark cavernous wonderland." - (Just Jazz July 2020)

Dave Rempis:Ten years from now, I can see musicians streaming concerts in real time and charging a minimal amount for people to watch.” - (DownBeat September 2013)

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11,600 (and counting) posts since we started blogging just over 12 years ago. 735 of them this year alone and, so far, 3 this month (July 1).

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As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Thursday, September 20, 2012

Fighting to Keep Jazz Alive

Digby Fairweather, one of our most respected jazz musicians, presenters and writers, has written a well crafted piece in the Daily Telegraph on the decline in popularity of jazz over the years pointing the finger fairly and squarely at the media and the BBC in particular. I find little to disagree with his arguments and it would be interesting to hear what others think although I'm not holding my breath.
Read the full article here. I'm grateful to The Jazz Breakfast blog for drawing this article to my attention.
Lance.

2 comments :

Steve Andrews said...

Excellent article - I particularly like the suggestion of a "Classic FM"- style Jazz radio station, to re-introduce (or simply introduce) audiences to Jazz via the immense back-catalogue of accessible recordings from the last 95 years. God knows there's enough there to guarantee interesting programming!
I'm usually quite pessimistic about the future of Jazz, certainly of Jazz styles pre-dating the late 1950's, but I was recently reminded that by the end of the 19th century Mozart was all but forgotten in this country, and very rarely performed until Thomas Beecham, amongst others, took up the torch and re-introduced his music to the concert hall, and therefore to the conciousness of the public. Old Wolfgang's not doing so bad nowadays, so perhaps there is some hope?

jazzband said...

good interesting post!!!

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