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Bebop Spoken There

Jimmy Vaughan: "I don't just want to turn out stuff because I'm supposed to. I'm not a plumber. I don't want it to be just a job" - (Downbeat, August 2019)

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Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Monday July 22

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (See above).

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Evening

?????.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Saturday, August 04, 2012

Strictly Smokin’ 7-Piece at the ‘Jazz Cafe’, Sage Concourse, Friday August 3

Michael Lamb (trumpet and MD); Alex Leathard (Trombone); Claude Werner (tenor sax); Dave Francis (drums); Jon Proud (bass); Gav Smith (piano); Ruth Lambert (vocals)
(Review by Ann Alex).
And they were straight in, no messing around, with Ruth singing Nice Work if you can Get It, and the band certainly did more than nice work, with skilled arrangements, interesting solos and trading of fours.  The sound was what I think of as ‘New York’, especially from the horns, but that may be just to my ears. 
Bye Bye Blackbird gave us a great sax solo from Claude, exciting but never too far from the melody. A harmonically strong arrangement of Lulu’s Back in Town had  distinctive chords from the horns between lines of the song; Skylark featured lovely flowing horns and effective muted trombone.  Next up was So What with, drums driving along sax and bass.  I noticed Claude chewing on a giant piece of chewing gum, then realised that he was coolly preparing a reed, without missing a note.  Stompin’ at the Savoy culminated with horns and piano swopping fours, followed by Our Delight, a tune which delights me as it seems to start in the middle – goodness knows what the technical term for that is.  The tunes continued to pour out and I wanted to dance.
Everyone had their share of solos and all impressed. The horns didn’t appear to be miked up yet all three sounded good - a combination of their ability and The Sage’s acoustics
Ruth sang more in the second half, well-sung standards, every word crystal clear.  You’d be so Nice to Come Home To; Embraceable You; How Long Has This Been Going On; Our Love is Here to Stay; The Lady is a Tramp; Get Happy. The performance ended with Do Nothing till You Hear from Me.  This song started a discussion on our table about what the words actually mean (answers on a postcard or at least in the comments box), and I guess the song also had the audience wishing to hear more from Ruth.
This gig had its own special atmosphere, what with the punters from the classical music concert coming out at half time, some clapping Ruth, others looking a bit puzzled, and the gentleman who sat next to me and told me about when he played piano for Peggy Lee.  An interesting and enjoyable evening.
Ann Alex   

2 comments :

Liz said...

Re Do nothing 'till you hear from me...I think the clue is in those last words...."and you never will". He is saying he is never going to end it, so it's up to her, either listen to gossip or put up with his philandering!!
Liz

Ann Alex said...

Liz, Yes, that's men for you, or at least some men!
Ann Alex

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance