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Bebop Spoken There

Buddy Guy: "My mother said, 'You got flowers for me, give 'em to me now, because I'm not going to smell them when you put 'em on the casket'." - (DownBeat September 2018).

Marty Ashby: "I asked him what his gig was and he said 'I put the scores on the music stands'. I said, 'That's a gig?' And I realised there were four floors of guys like him, who supported some of the finest musicians in the world. But I was a jazz musician, and I was used to playing with some of the finest musicians in the world in front of the New York Public Library for tips. That's when I realised that jazz didn't have the same support system as classical music. - (DownBeat September 2018).

Today Tuesday August 14

Afternoon

Classic Swing - The Ship, Front St., Monkseaton NE25 8DP. 1pm. Free.

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

CD Review: The Classic Jazz Masters – Jazz Roots: The Sound of New Orleans

Bob Wade (trumpet & clarinet), Roy Borrows (clarinet, alto saxophone & vocals), Zbigniew ‘Speedy’ Kobak (trombone), Sasha Sonnbichler (banjo & guitar), Cecil Ferreira (string bass) & Steven Wade (drums)
(Review by Russell).
The Classic Jazz Masters formed in 1988 to play the music of ‘the classic jazz masters’. Founding members Bob Wade and David Mills took up tv news presenter Kathy Fitch’s suggestion of calling the band after the ‘classic jazz masters’ of the 1910s, 20s and 30s. Stan Jones, one-time pianist in Johnny Dankworth’s band, was in the original line-up, and the band went on to record several CDs with varying personnel. Jazz Roots: the Sound of New Orleans is comprised of fourteen tracks and most of them are more than familiar including All of Me, Muskrat Ramble and Wabash Blues.

Jazz Roots: the Sound of New Orleans features two surviving members of the original septet – Bob Wade and Roy Burrows. Down the years some members of the band left, retired or joined the great jazz club in the sky. The album’s notes do not give recording dates, but a guess at the release date would place it at about 2010 or shortly after. Numbers by the likes of Jelly Roll Morton, Kid Ory and Duke Ellington give an indication of the band’s roots, titles are familiar, and, importantly, the sextet plays with enthusiasm and expertise. Basin Street, Morton’s Billy Goat Stomp and three from Duke – Caravan, East St Louis Toodle-Oo, and Creole Love Call – present the Classic Jazz Masters as a cohesive unit with all concerned stepping up to the soloist’s plate. From the early 1920s to the mid-30s, a swing element lies just beneath the surface of the band’s affectionate take on Crescent City jazz.  

Christopher Columbus swings, as does Jimmy Rushing’s Sent for You Yesterday and Here You Come Today, the latter featuring the fine, relaxed trombone playing of Zbigniew ‘Speedy’ Kobak and the excellent guitar playing of Sasha Sonnbichler. Clarinetist Roy Burrows, recently in the north east of England on a busman’s holiday from his home in South Africa, features throughout with concise and fluent solos, and frontline partner, trumpeter Bob Wade, can be heard with his trademark plunger blasts frequently igniting proceedings.         
            
Fourteen tracks, with a total playing time approaching 69 minutes, Jazz Roots: The Sound of New Orleans is worth tracking down. Trumpeter Bob Wade is the man to speak to, and if you happen to be in the north east of England get along to one of Classic Swing’s three current residencies (see Bebop Spoken Here’s gig guide) and meet the band leader – Mr Bob Wade.
Russell                 

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
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Lance