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Bebop Spoken There

Anat Cohen: "With the tenor, it's so iconic with jazz. With the clarinet, I can improvise, but it doesn't have to be called jazz." - (DownBeat July 2019)

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Today Tuesday June 18

Afternoon

Jazz

Classic Swing - The Ship Inn, Front Street, Monkseaton NE25 8DP. 0191 251 3677. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

Lickety Split - Fox Inn, West End Terrace, Hexham NE46 3DB.Tel: 01434 603681. 8:30pm. Free (donations).

River City Jazzmen - Block & Tackle, Blackthorn Way, Ashington NE63 8NW. Tel: 01670 813983 (info). 8:00pm. £5.00. (inc raffle). Line-up inc special guest Don Fairley (trombone).

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Saturday, November 25, 2017

CD Review: Henry Lowther's Still Waters - Can't Believe, Won't Believe

Henry Lowther (trumpet/flugel); Pete Hurt (tenor); Barry Green (piano); Dave Green (bass); Paul Clarvis (drums).
(Review by Lance).
The trumpet player has long been regarded as the flashy extrovert of any band or orchestra. The stentorian tone of the instrument can drown out the loudest drummer, even, we're told, bring down the walls of Jericho. Buddy Bolden, it was said, could be heard at the other side of Lake Pontchartrain - a distance of 20 miles. 
Hearing such trumpet players as Louis Armstrong, Harry James, Dizzy Gillespie, Maynard Ferguson, Arturo Sandoval, Kenny Baker and Bruce Adams live or on record serves as a further reminder of the instrument's power.
And yet, running parallel to the bombast of the above there's also another group. Players more minimalist. Introverts who, nevertheless, show that less can often be more.
Bix, Bobby Hackett, Miles, Chet and, more recently, Tomasso Stanko and Laura Jurd all belong to the latter school.
As does Henry Lowther.

This is only Henry Lowther's Still Waters' second album, the band's debut album, ID, going out in 1997, it is, nevertheless, well worth the wait. No tear-arse tempos nor, by the same token, are there any ten minutes long circular breathing exercises. Instead, it's clean, relaxed playing. It's a warm shower on a cool night, or a Pina Colada with lots of ice on a warm summer's evening. You let the music envelop you - it's more intoxicating than any cocktail - and you remember just how good a trumpet player Henry Lowther was and still is. This is Bix and the girl saying 'yes' all over again.
Up front with him, on tenor, Pete Hurt maintains the mood. Light of tone with a sackful ideas, Hurt proves the perfect partner for Lowther.
Barry Green lays down some delightful piano. No other words fit  - delightful it is!
Dave Green, long the doyen of UK bassists, doesn't put a finger wrong - he never does. I could make that statement without listening to the record and I wouldn't be open to contradiction. However, I did and I wasn't!
Paul Clarvis does the job as professionally as he always does.
Six originals by Lowther, one by Hurt and Bernstein's Some Other Time. Don't ask me for the other titles. Dark text on a slightly darker background doesn't make for easy reading. Still, you don't listen to the sleeve!
Lance
Release date isn't until February 23, 2018, however, as Still Waters have a couple of London dates in December, I've brought the review forward. It will reappear again in February
Dec. 7: Karamel, Chocolate Factory 2, Coburg Rd., Wood Green NE22 6UJ.
Dec. 8: Vortex Jazz Club, Gillett Sq., Dalston, London N16.

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