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Bebop Spoken There

Brian Carrick: "I contacted Max Jones of Melody Maker and offered to be his correspondent in the States, but I should have done what Ken Colyer had done, get a job on a ship and then jump ship in the States. So I didn't make it [to New Orleans] till 1973." - (Just Jazz May 1999)

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Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

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COVID-19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Wednesday, November 01, 2017

Maine Street Jazzmen @ The British Legion, Jesmond - Oct 31

Ray Harley (trumpet), Gavin Lee (clarinet), Herbie Hudson (trombone, harmonica & vocals), Malcolm Armstrong (keyboards), Tom Derbyshire (double bass) & Scotty Adair (drums)
(Review by Russell)
Halloween. Woooooo! Jesmond’s student population was out and about, dressed for the occasion – blood-splattered clothing, horrific, gaping wounds. It was, of course, all for fun. A sanctuary from such jolly japes would be found in the British Legion Club, or would it? Last Tuesday in the month, come rain or come ghoulies, the Maine Street Jazzmen play Dixieland.

Without ceremony, the Maine Street Jazzmen played Just a Little While to Stay Here before playing Original Dixieland One-Step, the very foundations of the music, the beginning of the Maine Street’s regular gig in the lounge at the Legion. Herbie Hudson led a powerful front line, flanked either side by Ray Harley, trumpet, and Gavin Lee on clarinet. And it was Mr Hudson who sang Old Fashioned Love with piano accompaniment by Malcolm Armstrong. The band got into its stride with a hot take on Wabash Blues with clarinetist Lee wailing for all he was worth. The front line soloed on Tin Roof Blues with pianist Armstrong following up.

The ghoulies couldn’t be kept at bay, and, it is sad to report that drummer Scotty Adair is now one of the ‘undead’ (see photo). The beers on the bar – all keg – were fit for drinking by ghoulies only. The Maine Street’s raffle prizes were snaffled by a table of regulars…hubble, bubble, cast a spell!

Second set – Whistling Rufus, Jelly Roll’s Milenberg Joys (Lee quipped: the Stan Kenton version), and Ray Harley showing what he could do with some superb trumpet playing on Climax Rag, this a typically upbeat selection from the Maine Street Jazzmen. Big Butter and Egg Man segueing into Bourbon Street Parade and that was the Maine Street done for another month. December’s gig will be the band’s Christmas party night and it will be a couple of weeks earlier than usual on Tuesday 19 December.

West Jesmond Metro Station, late night. Metro into town, blood everywhere, the night of the living dead. Exiting Central Station Metro Station – ‘hello’ to this character (see photo). He hadn’t been to a jazz gig…more’s the pity.

Russell                  

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