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Bebop Spoken There

Claire Martin: "I used to dye my hair like Marilyn Monroe and bomb around in a Sunbeam Rapier ''- (Jazz Cassette Vol 1 No. 2).


Bob Sinfield: "'Bebop in Britain' [4 CD set] has two potential categories of customer; those who are old enough to remember, and those who aren't." - (Jazz Cassette Vol 1 No. 2).


Today Sunday October 23

Stu Collingwood (solo piano) - Redwood Bar, Vermont Hotel, Castle Garth, Newcastle NE1 1RQ. 2pm. Free.
Giles Strong (solo guitar) - Cherry Tree Restaurant, 9 Osborne Rd., Jesmond, Newcastle. 1:00pm. No cover charge.
Musicians Unlimited - Park Inn, Park Rd., Hartlepool. 1pm. Free.
More Jam – The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 3pm. Free. All welcome to blow.
Vasilis Xenopoulos Quartet - Blaydon Jazz Club, Black Bull, Bridge St., Blaydon NE21 4JJ. 8pm. £7. *****
Baghdaddies - Trimdon Colliery & Deaf Hill WMC Club, TrimdonTS29 6AJ. 7:30pm. £3.
To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Sunday, October 23, 2016

CD Review: Matthew Kaminski Quartet w. Kimberley Gordon - Live at Churchill Grounds

Matthew Kaminski (Hammond SK2); Will Scruggs (sax); Rod Harris Jr. (gtr); Chris Burroughs (dms); Kimberley Gordon (vcl).
(Review by Lance).
Kaminski has a regular gig down in Atlanta GA. playing to a crowd of 40,000 each session and he does it over 80 times each year. That's 3 million listeners! Well, maybe they don't listen too intently having other things on their minds like if the Atlanta Braves can beat The Mets. Yes, Kaminski is the resident organist at all of The Braves home games. He doesn't play much jazz at the ball games. However, away from the ballpark, ensconced in Atlanta's premier jazz spot, Churchill Grounds, it's a, pardon the pun, a whole different ball game.

The Regals @ The Globe Jazz Bar, Newcastle - October 22.

Neil Hunter (vcl/keys); + gtr/bs gtr/dms.
(Observations by Lance)
Not a jazz gig by any means although who's to say the solos weren't jazz nor that the rocking soul voice of Hunter isn't blues? There are lines drawn in the sand between genres. Trouble is, sand is ever shifting.
For me, this was quite nostalgic reminding me of when I lived in a flat in Bell Street in Hebburn. Listening to Radio Caroline and the various other pirate radio stations. Of listening to the first Clay-Liston fight in the early hours.

Tim Garland Quartet @ Sage Gateshead – October 21

Tim Garland (tenor, alto saxophones, bass clarinet), Ant Law (guitars), Jason Rebello (keyboards), Asaf Sirkis (drums, percussion).
(Review by Steve Tolstoy/photo courtesy of Pam Young).
It was clear from the off this was something of a homecoming for Tim Garland. Turns out he used to teach music in Newcastle, lived in Whitley Bay for a time and recorded at Sage Gateshead while they were still finishing off the roof. This was home turf and it showed in his relaxed demeanour and infectious enthusiasm.
It was also obvious that this wasn’t a headliner and his band, but a real live super-group. His excitement at them ‘kicking your (his) ass each night’ was palpable, overflowing regularly through the night, whooping and clearly into their solos, leading the applause as he provided genuine backing with his various percussion objects. When you consider he played with Chick Corea for seventeen years, that these musicians plainly still blow him away ought to tell you something.

Saturday, October 22, 2016

Vasilis Xenopoulos with the Paul Edis Trio @ The Traveller’s Rest. October 21

Vasilis Xenopoulos (tenor saxophone), Paul Edis (keyboards), Ken Marley (double bass) & Russ Morgan (drums)
(Review by Russell/photo from archives).
8:00am Friday. Are you available for a gig tonight at the Traveller’s Rest, Darlington? Ken Marley answered in the affirmative. The former Voice of the North Jazz Orchestra double bass player made the journey across the Pennines at short notice to work with a regular visitor to Darlington, the one and only Vasilis Xenopoulos. It has been several years since bassist Marley featured in these BSH pages. It was, perhaps, a Voice of the North concert, or a memorable Marley septet gig at the Cluny in Newcastle. Whenever, wherever, it was way back when.
Tenor saxophonist Vasilis Xenopoulos is a favourite at Opus 4 Jazz Club. This October date is a fixture in the calendar (he’ll be back next year!), attracting fans from Tyneside to the north and Yorkshire to the south. From the walls of the upstairs room hang large portraits of the jazz greats. Over Xenopoulos’ left shoulder Dexter Gordon looked down. Vasilis likes Dexter, Dexter would have loved to hear Vasilis play! Darlington’s regular crowd loves to hear Vasilis play. They were queuing on the stairs well ahead of time. A sense of anticipation hung in the air…

CD Review: Giulio Romano Malaisi - Unexpected Ride.

Giulio Romano Malaisi (gtr); Michael Rosen (ten/sop); Dario Di Lecce (bs); Sophie Alloway (dms) + Filippo Dall'Asta (rhythm gtr on final track).
(Review by Lance).
As I become more and more disillusioned by what purports to be jazz - both live and on disc - out of the blue an album like this arrives, I'm reassured, the old values haven't gone, in this case, they've just been updated and by a guitarist from a small village in Italy who moved to London, for what was planned as a brief visit. However, young Giulio quickly became hooked on the vibrant music scene of England's capital city eventually, becoming a much sort after session player working across the genres.

Friday, October 21, 2016

The Musical Box play Genesis 'Selling England by the Pound' @ Newcastle City Hall October 20.

Not Peter Gabriel (lead vocals, flute, percussion), not Steve Hackett (guitars), not Tony Banks (keyboards, acoustic guitar, backing vocals), not Mike Rutherford (bass, guitars, backing vocals), not Phil Collins (drums, vocals).
(Review by Steve T).
At the risk of young Russell observing another 'essay' on prog rock and Lance adopting his gruff, husky, crackled whisper to tell me to 'take the pen out of my hand', I thought I'd risk another.
Jazz now seems to encompass any ambitious, experimental music and most emerging Jazz musicians have some familiarity with prog rock and many incorporate it. Prog was of its time in the late sixties/ early seventies when it seemed anything could happen and generally did. When pop wasn't rock and rock wasn't pop.

Alan Glen Trio @ The Empty Shop. October 20

Alan Glen (piano), John Pope (double bass) & Paul Wight (drums)
(Review by Russell) 
The Empty Shop is something of a misnomer. Walk up the stairs to the first floor space on one of its regular jazz nights and invariably the place will be heaving. A return visit featuring the north east’s master pianist Alan Glen proved to be no exception. As Glen began his set the ‘house full’ signs were being hung on the doors. Empty shop? Closed shop, more like!
Mr Glen lets the music do the talking: Love for Sale, Stella by Starlight, Love is a Many Splendoured Thing, the GAS book. Accompanying our softly spoken pianist were John Pope and Paul Wight; a firmly established working trio consistently attracting audiences wherever they play. Durham’s Empty Shop would reject any notion that it has adopted a ‘shabby chic’ look, it’s proudly shabby. Floor boards, paint splattered chairs…and jazz.

North of the 'Birder' - The Scottish National Jazz Orchestra directed by Tommy Smith presents The Legend of Charlie Parker

(Press release)
Charlie Parker is one of the most important figures in the history of jazz music, and one of its most tragic heroes. He is also one of a handful of twentieth-century musicians who was an authentic catalyst for far-reaching change.
The Scottish National Jazz Orchestra delves into the Parker catalogue and brings his brilliant vision to pulsating life in a concert series that will make this November one to remember. All of Charlie Parker’s original invention is explored, with further refinements in new arrangements specially commissioned by the SNJO.
There are new charts from Julian Argüelles, Sean Gibbs and Bill Dobbins, and original thinking from familiar SNJO arrangers Martin Kershaw, Florian Ross, Christian Elsässer, Laurence Cottle and Geoffrey Keezer. Their work allows the SNJO to re-visit Parker classics such as Donna Lee, Cheryl, Yardbird Suite, Parker’s Mood and Anthropology, and gild them with renewed vitality, fresh ideas and the gleam of modernity

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Don’t forget to book the babysitter!

Friday night at the Traveller’s Rest, Cockerton, Darlington, then, Sunday at the Black Bull, Blaydon. See you there! You have booked the babysitter, haven’t you? Honestly! Do it now before you forget. See you there! Yes, it’s the return of Vasilis Xenopoulos!

...with friends @ Newcastle o2 Academy. October 19

(Review by Russell)
Study Music at Sage Gateshead…
Nick Pride and the Pimptones with friends…
Plus Special Guests…
So read the blurb on the ticket stub. Sage Gateshead’s annual parade of tutor talent upped sticks for one night only to perform at Newcastle’s o2 Academy. An audience comprised of students and a handful of ex/non-students heard how it could/should be done. The jazz grapevine suggests the new student intake shows great promise. Expect to hear them out and about in the coming months.       
Quality is the word. The core Coast Road ensemble (Dave Camlin, Bex Mather, Bethany Elen-Coyle and Paul Susans) opened the show in typically understated fashion – walk on, plug in (acoustic guitars) and play. Original material, one of which Bex Mather sang with the Sapphires, reworked for the occasion, the vocal harmonies spot on, the quartet joined on a couple of numbers by friends Rob Walker and Paul Edis. Dave Camlin alluded to an all-too-familiar irritant – the ‘be a star in five minutes’ illusion – with Tonight Matthew, a proper tune about being oneself.
Coast Road: Dave Camlin (guitar & vocals), Bex Mather (guitar & vocals), Bethany Elen-Coyle (guitar & vocals) & Paul Susans (double bass, electric bass & vocals) + Rob Walker (drums) & Paul Edis (keyboards).

LP Review: Dexter Gordon - Fried Bananas

.Dexter Gordon (tenor); Rein De Graaff (piano); Henk Haverhook (bass); Eric Ineke (drums). Recorded November 3, 1972.
(Review by Lance).
Back in the day, in L.A., when Wardell Gray and Dexter were slugging it out on The Chase in Central Avenue bars and clubs, I'd always, on the recorded evidence, leaned towards Wardell with his lighter, more subtle approach. However, when Dex recorded those classic Blue Note Albums, I had to admit that Wardell, if he'd still been around, may well have lost the re-match!
That was Dexter at his greatest - or so I thought until I heard this album!

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

CD Review: Cameron Mizell - Negative Spaces.

Cameron Mizell (Guitar), Brad Whitely (Keyboards), Kenneth Salters (Drums).
(Review by Steve T).
For anyone who's wondering, I can't find anything to relate Cameron to the Mizell Brothers whose production transformed Donald Byrd from one of the great hard bop trumpeters to one of the great Jazz-funk artists.
The Hammond/guitar trio is one of my favoured line-ups in Jazz. Between the white European guitarists who book-end the golden years of Jazz the guitar initially struggled to get heard between saxophones and trumpets (or even piano) but, once satisfactorily amplified, became prone to lapses into easy-listening, often rescued by the famous Hammond organ. Almost every significant Jazz guitarist has put it to use and this is no exception, although Whitely uses a variety of keyboards.

At the North Shields Jazz Band Ball!

(Preview by Russell)
Jazz at the Exchange! It’s like old times. Mike Durham’s series of classic jazz concerts at the then Saville Exchange on Howard Street in North Shields set the standard and now, in 2016, the rejuvenated Exchange venue is once again to host jazz. On Saturday, October 22, three of the region’s top bands unite to present a triple bill of jazz and blues. The hall and its raked seats are as before with cabaret style seating in front of the stage. The jazz starts at seven o’clock with the now legendary Rae Brothers. Mac and Dave know their Bolden from their Beiderbecke, steeped in the jazz of New Orleans. A jumpin’ blues session with Brian Lynham’s No Time for Jive follows at 8:15, and to round off the evening, Maureen Hall’s Rendezvous Jazz take to the stage at nine thirty.

Preview: The Bad Plus + Binker and Moses @ Sage Gateshead - November 8

(Preview by Steve T)
This one really is a big deal, like the Cookers and Robert Glasper the following week. All three acts are playing the Epic ten day London Jazz Festival but in Gateshead they're all playing the same room while in London they won't even be on the same Underground Line. So, a bit of a Jazz Fest in November and if  Sage Gateshead can attract three acts of this calibre in April we'll be guaranteed another quality festival.

Jazz Café Jam Session - October 18.

(Review by Lance).
A cracking session and what did I do? I misplaced my notes! Apologies for missing names and numbers.
So I'm winging it! The house trio set the standard with Whisper Not and Amando's Rumba. They were on form. All three were on fire. 
A quartet of students from Sage Gateshead's BMus degree course took centre stage. Seemingly lead by guitarist Brent March they played acceptable versions of Sunny and All of Me. A work in progress. Brent told me this was, in fact, the first time they'd played together so the future looks promising. Fine musicians not heard to their best advantage. Do they have any original material? You betcha they will have! Watch this space. 
Time for the big hitters.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: I look forward to hearing from you.