Total Pageviews

Bebop Spoken There

Erin Davis: "I knew he [Miles Davis] was a famous musician, but didn't quite understand how famous." - (The Observer Magazine 29 March 2020)

-----

Archive

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COFID- 19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Friday, February 14, 2014

Two Is an Odd Number! - Paul Edis and Graham Hardy @ the Lit.& Phil, February 14.

Paul Edis (piano) and Graham Hardy (trumpet and flugelhorn).
(Review/Photos by Jerry E.)
Two is an odd number at most jazz gigs but, as was flagged up on Bebop and elsewhere, there are precedents such as Louis and Earl. Anyway, on Valentine’s, I suppose, a trio would be a crowd! And there were some appropriate song-choices for the day: I Loves You Porgy and La Vie en Rose for example. The Gershwin is even more romantic as introduced by one bandleader: ”written by George Gershwin and his lovely wife, Ira”! There was also My Valentine (Funny) which for me WAS an odd number not least because I never found the remembered melody, even in the middle!
A counter-note was sounded by You Don’t Know What Love Is and an Edis/Hardy original called You Talkin’ to Me? These titles sounded, respectively, like the precursors of a domestic and a saloon-bar brawl! The set-list was completed by some more neutral titles: Ellington’s Black and Tan Fantasy; Bernard Herrmann’s Theme from Taxi-driver; Bach’s Two Part Invention (Number 4) and Miles Davis’ Sipping at Bells.
Graham played about 50/50 trumpet/flugel and added a variety of effects by deploying an array of plungers and mutes including, on La Vie en Rose, a “Mel-O-Wah” mute which I don’t think I’ve seen before. It was perfect for the tune!
Paul, too, played in a range of styles from classical to (his word, not mine) “schmaltzy” and also surprised me on You Don’t Know What Love Is by ceremonially removing his jacket as if to perform a conjuring trick, dismantling bits of piano and then playing with one hand on the keyboard and the other INSIDE the piano, which I am positive I have not seen before! I have dubbed the resultant sound “Edwardian Funk” – a bit like playing keys and bass simultaneously! I’d be grateful to anyone who could fill me in on the correct terminology. For a one-hour concert the tunes chosen were incredibly varied.
There was a good audience (40+) and they seemed to enjoy it all judging by the applause which built as the set unfolded.
My personal favourites today were the last three – Bach, Davis and Piaf. Odd bedfellows, I know, but all astonishing, delightful and oh, so well played!
This was the first of six lunchtime concerts at this venue: next up is The Ruth Lambert Trio on March 14.

Jerry.

No comments :

Blog Archive