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Bebop Spoken There

David Binney: "In this age, we musicians need to do anything we can to make a living, and ninety-nine percent of us will have to do a wide variety of things." - (Jazz Times May 2019)

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Until July 21

Today Monday July 15

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (See above).

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Evening

Mnozil Brass: Cirque - Gala Theatre, Millennium Place, Durham DH1 1WA. Tel: 0300 266 600. 7:30pm. £23.00. (£19.00. concs.). A Durham Brass Festival event.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, July 25, 2011

SAGE SUMMERTYNE AMERICANA FESTIVAL 2011

This concert was opened in fine form by The Sage’s home-grown Blues Choir, led by Lindsay Hannon, doing a lively version of Basin Street Blues. They looked impressive in black with some purple and pink hair decorations and hats, standing in three rows across the stage. Songs included 'Tain't What You Do; Ain’t Misbehavin’; Another Man Done Gone; (think that was the title) and Down in the Treme. They did a grand job, together with pianist Alan Law, getting the audience into the Americana mood.
Then came the Soul Rebels Brass Band who hail from Louisiana, two trumpets, sax, trombone, sousaphone and drums and percussion. This band had a generally Cajun sound which I think jazzers would find very appealing. There were few breaks in between numbers, each tune morphing into the next one, with a pleasing, constant fuzzy sort of thump (the sousaphone or a drum?) and the prevailing tinkle of a cymbal, which would be produced by a triangle in Cajun bands. They began with an extended version of Wimoweh, and continued with Night in Tunisia and St James Infirmary. The horns did short effective solos.
They were determined to get audience participation by clapping and waving but I felt they overdid the encouragement somewhat, and I found it a bit off-putting. The band left the stage at what appeared to be the end of the set and some of the audience headed for the bar, and so missed the return of the band and the choir in a final song. But this was a really good set despite these hiccups.
Irma Thomas, Soul Queen on New Orleans, who has won Grammy awards six times, looking really striking in a long yellow dress, took to the stage with her band of seven musicians, two guitars, two keyboards, trumpet, sax, and drums, including congas for good measure. Not sure if I can give her full credit as I’m no expert on Soul music and I must confess that, unlike the audience, I wasn't familiar with her work, but she certainly gave full enthusiastic value for money. Singing for about one and a half hours Ms Thomas let the audience choose most of the numbers and even sang Happy Birthday. She did mostly love songs, including, if I have the titles correct, Love Don’t Change, People Do; If You Want Love Bring it with You; Don’t Make Me Stop Now; Hold Me While I Cry and Breakaway, all sung in a strong earthy voice. I think she would have sung for the rest of the night if it had been possible.
The three events that I’ve been to during this festival have made the definition of ‘Americana’ music somewhat clearer to me, but I’m left wondering how other people would define this term. Any clarification, anyone?
Ann Alex.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance