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Bebop Spoken There

Randy Brecker: "It's still a thrill for me today to stand out front of a big band as the soloist and hear all that sound going on behind you. It brings the best out of me" - (DownBeat June 2019).

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2019 Parliamentary Jazz Awards

The voting is open between now and May 31 to enable site visitors to nominate their choices in the various categories of this year's APPJAG awards which can be done here.
BSH was very proud to be nominated and to win the 2018 Media Award and hope we can have your support again this year.

Today Monday May 20

Afternoon

Jazz

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, July 09, 2010

Midnight in Mayfair - Another View.

Picture this - a little girl eating her Sunday's dinner, the smell of freshly baked bread, then she's off to Sunday School to hear tales of Baptist missionaries, and all this is accompanied by the sound of Billy Cotton with his 'Wakey Wakey' and songs such as Any Old Iron and I've Never Seen a Straight Banana.
This scene of childhood came flooding back to me at this very enjoyable musical show which incorporated useful mini lectures on each of the bands whose work was played. This was dance music rather than jazz, which could have pleased many types of audience. The band's attire conveyed the atmosphere well - smart dark suits, white shirts and black bow ties with white jackets for the leaders. Janice Day, the lady vocalist, really did look like a lady. She was pretty in pink and purple during the first set, then became sophisticated in a black sequinned outfit for the second set. Add to this her beautifully waved and curved blonde hair and red lipstick, and you get the early 20th century picture.
The singing styles were very different from pure jazz. Ms. Day was a sweet light soprano, which was authentic for the time, and she acted well in amusing songs such as Cole Porter's The Physician. Tom 'Spats' Langham sounded good in his Al Bowlly tribute songs, beautifully smooth and relaxing.
One of the main stars in the show was the drumkit, played by Nick Ward, which dated from 1934, and had many interesting clinky clanky bits, and whistles, which served well in Choo Choo,(Yes, it's a portrayal of a train) taken from the band of Jack Payne.
Many of the bands, such as Ambrose and Phillip Lewis were before my time, but it didn't spoil the enjoyment. The sheer liveliness and fun was what came across. I went home wondering if we all take ourselves a bit too seriously nowadays. What do you think?
Ann Alex.

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