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Bebop Spoken There

YolanDa Brown: "Ron Dennis (former McLaren Formula 1 chairman) introduced me as 'the Lewis Hamilton of the jazz world'. I thought, 'I'll take that'." - (i newspaper July 17, 2019)

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Until July 21

Today Sunday July 21

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden. (See above).

Streets of Brass - Durham city centre. DH1. 11:00am-5:00pm. Free. A Durham Brass Festival event.

Alice Grace & Ben Helm - Bonbar, Fenkle St., Newcastle NE1 5XU. Tel: 0191 232 8695. 1:30pm.

Vieux Carré Hot 4 - Spanish City, Spanish City Plaza, Whitley Bay NE26 1BG. 12 noon. Free.

Musicians Unlimited - Park Inn, Park Road, Hartlepool TS26 9HU. Tel: 01429 233126. 1:00pm (doors 12 noon). Free.

Jazz Social - Charts, Quayside, Newcastle NE1 3DX. Tel: 0191 338 7989. 4:00pm. Free.

Rajasthan Heritage Brass Band - Middlesbrough Town Hall, Albert Road, Middlesbrough TS1 2QJ. Tel: 01642 729729. 2:00pm. Free. A Summer Sessions in the Courtyard event.

Blues/Funk/Soul

Summertyne Americana - Sage Gateshead, St Mary’s Square, Gateshead Quays, Gateshead NE8 2JR. Tel: 0191 443 4661. King Bees 1:30-2:15pm. Free. Jumpin’ Hot Club stage.

Memphis Cruisers - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 3:00pm. Free.

Evening

Jazz

East Coast Jazz Jam - The Exchange, Howard Street, North Shields NE30 1SE. Tel: 0191 258 4111. 6:00pm. Free.

Scottish Swing Orchestra & Festival Broadway Chorus: West End Meets Wharton - Wharton Park, Durham DH1 4FJ. 6:00-8:00pm. Free. A Durham Brass Festival event. Details.

John Garner & Paul Edis + Nathan Lawson - Black Bull, Bridge St., Blaydon NE21 4JJ. Tel: 0191 414 2846. 7:30pm. £7.00. Garner (violin) & Edis (piano) play Bill Evans & original material. Support set from Nathan Lawson (guitar). Blaydon Jazz Club.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Sunday, July 25, 2010

Memories of Chris by Ann Alex

I just have to tell blog readers about one of my favourite memories of Chris Yates. I was a student of his Jazz Appreciation classes at the Centre for Lifelong Learning, from about 2008. He was an absolutely great tutor and a lovely man, as I’m sure many blog readers already know. He was very patient with me, as a beginner in Jazz. Anyway, one day he was talking to us about the Great American Songbook (GASBOOK, as Lance calls it!). I was somewhat puzzled about this, so I asked Chris, with an innocent smile on my little face,
‘Chris, can I get the Great American Songbook out of the library?’
He must have wanted to laugh out loud, but good tutors can’t do that, especially not with adult students. He gently explained what the term really meant, that it was a concept rather than an actual book, although the components of the GASBOOK must be contained in many books, on sheet music and on CD and even on old fashioned tapes and cylinders.
Which leads me to speculate about what is to be included In the Great American Songbook. This blog is meant to be for real live discussions, so I’d love to start a debate about what the GASBOOK really is. Everyone knows about the jazz standards which are part of the GASBOOK, but could you perhaps include more recent compositions, say the songs of Bob Dylan; Randy Newman; or Burt Bacharach, and if not, then why not?
Ann Alex

7 comments :

Lance said...

This is one of those 'eyes (or in this case ears)of the beholder' situations.
The general consensus is that it applies to songs written post World War 1 to 1960 or perhaps the advent of Rock and Roll. However, this would eliminate composers such as Stephen Sondheim whose work certainly belongs there.
Also, I don't think the composers have to be exclusively birth Americans. Ray Noble was British and few would deny The Very Thought of You entry to its pages.
On a lighter note - if the Gasbook had been available from the library you'd have had to hire a Pickfords truck to get it home!

Roly said...

An interesting topic. A subjective thing I think. To me its a personal and perhaps idiomatic choice. Some more recent songs (by Dave Frishberg for one example) are Gasbook material but other songs (eg. LLoyd Webber) just don't seem to meet the rather vague, nebulous criteria - whatever these vague, nebulous criteria be.
Hmmm - this is no help whatever - is it?
Roly

Roly said...

I've thought a bit more about this.
I think it embodies all songs (generally with English/American lyrics) which have a reasonable level of popularity and which reasonable numbers of jazz musicians and jazz singers are (or have been) attracted to for performance material.
Roly

George Milburn said...

I think the GASBook should remain as defined for the sake of convenience. i.e. great songs, generally in English, of the jazz era 20's to 60's. There's so much subjectivity and hyperbole in music that having map references which mean something is a help, especially for strangers to the terrain.
I agree, with Lance that Sondheim's work is great, isn't it! with Ann's election of Randy Newman & Dylan and Roly's comments on Dave Frishberg, not to mention the great Tom Waits, but including them under a label from a different era is in my opinion folly. A bit like saying that the Vikings were really sophisticated enough to be included in the period of the Roman Occupation. I like the Vikings obviously but what did the Romans ever do for us?!
Tom Jobim wrote in Portuguese but surely he must be in the GASbook?!

Blue said...

This is the way I see it. The Great American Songbook is a term for describing a collection of songs written between 1920 and 1960ish that have become standard repertoire for jazz singers.

Contemporary jazz singers often include more modern material in their repertoire, notably Lennon/McCartney, Joni Mitchell, Dolly Parton, but these should not be considered part of The Great American Songbook. To do so would undermine its usefulness as a definition.

However, I think you could say that songs such as Yesterday, River or I Will Always Love You are becoming standards.

Russell said...

Roly's suggestion that 'nebulous criteria' define the Gasbook is a good one. Keep it as it is. It is a bit like the old line 'If you have to ask what jazz is...' We shouldn't admit any old song writer (and certainly no young ones!). George's observation about Jobim is well made. He's in there for me, after all Sinatra helped put him there!

Russell

Ann Alex said...

I'm very pleased that the topic I started has given rise to a useful discussion. Thank you everyone. I've come to the conclusion that the GASbook is probably best defined as English and American songs of the period 1920-60. However that doesn't mean that Jazz singers always have to stick to GASbook material in their performances. And as Lance once said to me, GASbook songs have a certain universal quality and are often not identified with any particular singer, or even with their composer sometimes. As a sometime singer I think I'd draw the line at LLoyd Webber, mind!

Blog Archive

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance