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Bebop Spoken There

Andrew Hadro: "It seems to me that everybody just puts out an album, they go through the motions, spend the money and they just sort of throw it out there into the sea of CDs and hope something comes back" - (DownBeat June 2018).

Jonnathan Blake (Blindfold Test): “Maybe it's someone from New Orleans who has lived in New York for a minute.” (DownBeat June 2018).

Today Monday May 21

Afternoon.

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

Jazz FM - a Paul Edis track to be played between 6-7pm. (50 mins. in)

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Alto Summit @ Jazz Café Jam Session - February 20

(Review by Lance).
If the keyword tonight had been sex as opposed to sax then this wouldn't have been a jam session but a bacchanalian orgy. As it was, with 4 altos and 2 tenors strutting their stuff it was certainly an evening of musical hedonism for both players and listeners.
It all began quite sedately with the house trio, this week with Stu Collingwood at the helm, gently swinging through A Foggy Day and Masquerade. The temperature rose with the arrival of Ray Johnson all the way from Northallerton. This may seem a distance but, as he previously commuted from Rothbury, probably an easier trip thanks to Richard Branson.
Ray was on flugel tonight and the mellow-toned instrument did justice to Pennies From Heaven and likewise, an edgier take on Stanley Turrentine's Sugar.
Debra Milne is never one to take the easy way out and our girl met the challenge of vocalising Coltrane's Equinox head on - the gal's got guts!
By now the room was alive as the student population descended.
Ben Richardson spelled Stu on piano, Abbie Finn gave Paul a break on drums and George Sykes set the pace on tenor with There Will Never be Another You. So far so good but when Dan Garel (the first of the altos) joined him we knew this really was a jam session. Kenny Burrell's Chitlins Con Carne the test piece. (Photo by Russell)
To describe Garel's playing as 'fluent' is like describing Usain Bolt as a 'jogger'. Garel fairly soared through the changes at almost twice the speed of light. Wisely, Sykes didn't try to outrun him but, instead, concentrated on content culminating with a bass and tenor exchange that levelled the score.
Ben Richardson separated the protagonists with a fine solo whilst Abbie Finn had a few explosions of her own to keep the boys on their toes. Needless to say, John Pope played a blinder all night despite there being no bass players in the house to give him a break.
Garel stayed aboard for Days of Wine and Roses. Ray Johnson returned along with tenorist Simon Probyn and Tom Hogg on drums.
Dan and Tom stepped down for Adam Stapleford, of the contemporary jazz group Taupe at the kit.
It Don't Mean a Thing proved that Adam has studied jazz past, present and future. He fitted in.
The delightful Inês Gonçalves from Portugal (photo by Russell), in the company of guitarist Peter, played Spain! It was one of those jam session moments when nobody quite knew when to stop - all good fun!
It had been a while since alto player number 2, Jordan Alfonso, showed at the Caff. He excelled on Take the A Train and held his own with alto number 3, Jimmy Jefford, on Beautiful Love. Paul Wight took the honours, however, with an amazing solo on brushes.
Inês returned, this time to sing Corcovado. Alto number 4, Tom Dixon joined the gang for this popular (with Portuguese singers) bossa nova.
The evening was drawing to a close but there was still time for Joel Brown to capture the piano stool for Autumn Leaves.
Final number, I'm told, was Mercy, Mercy, Mercy! but, by this time, I was on the platform waiting for the Metro.
Another killer jam at the Jazz Café.
Photos.
Lance.
PS: Because of the abundance of pianists we didn't hear as much of Stu Collingwood as many of us would have wished. However, needless to say, when he was playing he did the business as one would expect from such a classy player.
Stu Collingwood (piano); John Pope (bass); Paul Wight (drums) + Ray Johnson (flugel); Debra Milne (vocal); Ben Richardson (piano); George Sykes (tenor); Abbie Finn (drums); Dan Garel (alto); Simon Probyn (tenor); Tom Hogg (drums); Adam Stapleford (drums); Inês Gonçalves (piano & vocals); Peter ? (guitar); Jordan Alfonso (alto); Jimmy Jefford (alto); Tom Dixon (alto); Joel Brown (piano).

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Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to them all other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance

About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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