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Bebop Spoken There

Jim Hall: "Won't play loud, can't play fast" - (From one of the great guitarist's business cards brought to our attention by Roly Veitch).

Joel Harrison: “It’s incredibly hard to play bebop on guitar, harder than on saxophone.” – (Jazz Times August 2015)

Sir Thomas Beecham: "Forget about the bars. Look at the phrases, please. Remember that bars are only the boxes in which the music is packed" - (Beecham Stories by Harold Atkins & Archie Newman. Robson Books, 1978).

Today Wednesday June 28

Afternoon.
Vieux Carre Jazzmen - Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 3OS. 1pm. Free.
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Evening.
Take it to the Bridge - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. £1. 8pm.
Chris Sharkey Trio - Jazz Café. 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 8pm. £5/Students free - voluntary donation.
Levee Ramblers NOJB - Springwell Village Community Venue, Fell Road, Springwell, Gateshead NE9 7RP. 8:30pm. £3.00.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Monday, January 23, 2017

Budtet @ The Globe Jazz Bar - January 21

Stuart Finden (tenor sax), Fiona Finden (vocal, soprano sax), Jude Murphy (vocal, alto sax), Lin Lee Wong (piano), Jim Crinson (bass), Eric Stutt (drums).+ Dave Weisser (cornet/vocal).
(Review by Steve T/photos courtesy of Stu Finden). 
If Friday night was about 'serious' Jazz, tonight's Jazz Coop gig was about having fun. That's not intended as a derogatory statement, alongside the standard quintet, imbibing and Chinese food, having fun is one of my favourite things.
The  Message and Stu’s Bloos led to Four on Sixa Wes Montgomery piece with lyrics by Fiona Finden, who sang and played un-straightened soprano sax.

Jude introduced Like Someone in Love as having a theatrical intro which she played to the max throughout the song. Move over Liza Minnelli.
Corcovado was followed by Teaneck which led to an exchange in the band as to whether it was written by Nat or Cannonball. The brothers, alongside Ellington/Strayhorn and Davis/Evans (Bill), are often the subject of this type of discussion. My copy of Mercy Mercy Mercy says it's by Cannonball Adderley, not Joe Zawinul. I can see a time when SinAtra never made a record and Elvis only made one, or two halves. Lance and I have both claimed recently, it's not just the song but what the artist does with it.
Mr PC closed side one and another saxophonist with JC all over his sleeves.
Once more we got added lyrics with the saxy ladies harmonising well together, but they stuck with Paul Chambers rather than transferring them to their own bass player.
Side two opened with more lyrics added to a classic which, as a track from Jazz' very own(ly) sacred cow - Kind of Blue - may or may not be sacrilegious. Many of the audience of just under thirty, which is a good number for the size of the venue, were friends of members of the band, especially the seriously impressive pianist, and it was fascinating and quite encouraging to see people who didn't appear to be Jazz folk, clearly well versed in that album. Jude switched to flute which I've never heard on All Blues, gradually introducing the vocalising technique Jethro Tull’s Ian Anderson stole from Roland Kirk and she duly ended the piece on one leg, which I'm sure she didn't even notice.
One Note Samba, I Fall in Love too Easily, Groovin High and Secret Love before Dave Weisser joined them for Yardbird Suite and Take the A Train, adding muted trumpet and some seriously impressive singing.
Rather more vocals added to classics than I would play at home, but each of the singers acquitted themselves well. If Jude was Liza Minnelli, Fiona was Doris Day but, if she lacked the grain of the great soul singers, she displayed the fragility and vulnerability of the best ones.
How often do you get Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis and John Coltrane in a single night? 

Steve T.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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