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Bebop Spoken There

Bob Dawbarn (review of Joe Harriott's LP 'Free Form'): "Both horns scream and roar away, Keane at times doing a pretty fair imitation of an elephant angry with its keeper." - (Melody Maker, December 16, 1961).

Steve Race: "The non-musician critic knows how music ought to sound. But he cannot possibly know how it feels to create it. He is in the position of the marriage guidance counsellor who has never been married." – (Jazz News, June 6th 1962).

Archives.

Today Thursday July 27

Afternoon
Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Holystone, Whitley Rd., nr. Newcastle NE27 0DA. 1:oopm. Free.
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Tyne Valley Jazzmen - No 1 Champagne Bar, 1 Market Place, Bishop Auckland DL4 7 NJ 12:30pm. Free.
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Evening.
Strictly Smokin' Big Band - The Millstone, Haddricks Mill Rd., South Gosforth NE3 3DB. 7pm. Cancelled for pub refurbishment. Back August 31.
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Alter Ego - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 8pm. £5.
Jo Harrop & Paul Edis - The Jazz Café, 25 Pink Lane, Newcastle NE1 5DW. 8pm
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Maine Street Jazzmen - Potter's Wheel, Sunniside NE16 5EE, 8:30pm. Free.
Ray Johnson & Richard Herdman - Prohibition Bar, Arch 3, Brandling St., Gateshead NE2 2BA. 8pm. Free.
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Paul Skerritt Band - The Pennyweight, Bakehouse Hill, Darlington DL1 5QA. 9pm. Free.
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Tees Hot Club w. Kevin Eland (tpt); Donna Hewitt (alto); Graham Thompson (keys); Mark Hawkins (drums) - Dormans, Oxford Rd., Middlesbrough TS5 5DT. Free. 9pm.
Pocket Jazz Orchestra "Jazz & Tapas" - No 60, Arc, Dovecote St., Stockton TS18 1LL 7pm. £10.
New Orleans Preservation Jazz Band - Oxbridge, Oxbridge Lane, Stockton TS18 4AW. 8:30pm.01642 678129.
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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Sunday, January 08, 2017

Zoe Gilby (vocal)/ Alan Law (piano) @ The Jazz Café - January 6

What a lovely way to start the New Year. It seemed like only Yesterday that This Boy Alan and the Girl Zoe performed a selection of Beatles and Antonio Carlos Jobim songs with great charm and invention. Something was really in the air on Friday night maybe not Across the Universe but certainly in the packed Jazz Café. I was sat next to Sexy Sadie when I said to her I Want to Hold Your Hand she flew off like a Blackbird so I guessed there was no point of asking my supplementary question Why Don’t We Do It In The Road. Now we all know How Insensitive The Jazz Café audience can be shouting at each other as if they were at the Gallowgate End but on Friday you could have heard a pin drop which just shows how captivating the duo were.  The end of the evening came so there was to be No More Blues all that remained to be done was to Wave goodbye.
Steve H.

6 comments :

  1. Sounds like it was anything but a Hard Day's Night and you certainly didn't need any Help to write the review but as regards Sadie, She Loves You and sends All Her Loving even though you're Back in the USSR.

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    Replies
    1. Thought about it but I'd have to drive my car. Somebody said all you need is love for the Beatles but if I were to list my favourite bands and songwriters the Beatles would be nowhere man. They're here, there and everywhere eight days a week. Zoe was on and I love her but if big Andy's around you've got to hide your love away, especially if she loves you.
      Also Uni started back up so Number One (only ever considered a recommendation when it's the Beatles) Son had to get back and we weren't sure when so I said let it be Friday. When we got there we saw one of the staff who knew I'd done the Southport preview and said here comes the son.
      I don't have room for the Beatles in my life, maybe when I'm 64 and give up on the revolution. Til then all my loving is for soul, jazz, blues, rock and reggae; proper singers, proper songwriters and proper musicians. Not a walrus in a strawberry field with diamonds.

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  2. So, you didn't have a Ticket to Ride and she didn't say Baby You Can Drive my Car plus the threat of Lovely Rita Meter Maid put you off your Magical Mystery Tour. Well it would have been a Hard Day's Night without any Help but, With a Little Help From Your Friends...
    Seriously, at the end of the day it's the interpretation as much as the material and many a performer has made a purse out of a sow's ear and I'm sure that Zoe and Alan wouldn't have gone into the purse-making business (musically speaking) if they regarded the Fab Four's songs as 'sow's ears'.
    From Me To You - The End.

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  3. I agree entirely; Arun Ghosh played a stunning version of TNK at the Sage. Mind that is a brilliant original; Phils Collins and Manzanera both did decent versions as well. I saw Andy Sheppard do And I Love Her and it was brilliant; way better than the original. JJ Barnes did a decent version of Daytripper, I think it was Stevie Wonder who did We can work it out and the Impressions did Fool on the Hill but, as my second favourite Fabs track, it should have been better. MJ did probably the best version of Come Together.
    But how did they become SO over-rated?

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  4. Obviously, marketing. If you'd been on the scene in the early '60s you couldn't escape them. Mainstream press, TV, pirate radio. "We're greater than God" said Lennon and in the eyes of the young they were. And many of the tunes are still excellent (did they really write all those numbers in such a relatively short space of time? They probably did although the jury's still out on that one.)
    The fact that so many of their songs have become standards and performed across the genres is proof of their quality. I think Ray Davies is one of the few of their contemporaries whose material displays the same longevity.
    I was unfamiliar with 'And I Love Her' until I heard it by Roland Kirk. Imagine my surprise upon discovering it wasn't by some revered name from the (then) past. As I type I'm listening to José Feliciano playing the same tune and, if I'd heard it first I'd have probably thought it was by Jobim!

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  5. I was born in 61 so I remember them being everywhere, like the Spice Girls 30 years later only more so. For my generation they weren't even teenybop songs but nursery rhymes.
    I'm not sure artists, and particularly jazz artists, covered them because they thought they were great but, as Dylan said when Joan Baez covered Yesterday, 'it's the thing to do to tell the teenyboppers you dig the Beatles'.
    Certainly they had a knack for writing catchy pop songs only matched by people like Abba and the Beegees, but were more prolific. In my view that doesn't put them with the great songwriters.
    I'm pretty sure the quote was 'we're more popular than Jesus' but this was among the young. Nobody really cared much about them in the seventies and in the eighties they became the most unlikely cult band for the growing number of fans of a growing number of dead popstars with, give or take Marvin Gaye in soul, the best death story.
    Young people think we've all been listening to them since the early sixties but it's only really in the nineties, with their army of original fans grown up: parents, grandparents, teachers, lecturers, reporters, media executives, authors etc that they, and particularly John Lennon, became all things to all people; like Mozart, Beethoven, Shakespeare, Churchill, Leonardo, Picasso, the Dali Lama and Jesus rolled into one. The reason the sun rises, the sky is blue, water falls, flowers grow and wilderbeast sweep majestically across the Torquay skyline. If this sounds over the top, it's probably because we've had so much of it, we accept it as normal. Van Morrison claimed the media made it all up and the bands - though not all of them - just went along with it and so-called British Blues artists still think of them as teenyboppers; I recall one comparing them to Westlife and Steve Wright spluttering, though he had to agree.
    George Harrison became a huge critic of the mythology in his final years, referring to it as Beatle-lore.
    I expect something similar to happen with Bowie in the coming years - I call it the revenge of the teenyboppers.
    On Ray Davies, I knew you liked him and wondered whether it was his heavy riffs and/or English (rather than American) lyrics.

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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