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Bebop Spoken There

Brian Carrick: "I contacted Max Jones of Melody Maker and offered to be his correspondent in the States, but I should have done what Ken Colyer had done, get a job on a ship and then jump ship in the States. So I didn't make it [to New Orleans] till 1973." - (Just Jazz May 1999)

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COVID-19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Wednesday, February 03, 2016

Jazz Café Jam Session - Feb. 2

(Review by Lance)
Whilst there was a gale force wind outside, they were also blowing up a storm inside and, although the jammers weren't standing ten deep at the bar waiting to give it their best shot, those that were there did themselves proud.
On drums tonight a rare appearance by Dave McKeague - he did good. Bradley and the trio got things rolling with A Weaver of Dreams and Jim Hall's Waltz New, a number that went seamlessly from 3/4 to 4/4 with no loss of momentum, swinging all the way. No More Blues then Watch What Happens.
What happened was a belter of a drum solo from McKeague.
Gilligan relinquished the piano and the brave Anyfantis took over - any pianist who follows Gilligan is brave! Nevertheless, George did okay with All of Me and Secret Love.
Enter The Broons. Father and son, bass player and pianist. Young Joel now sports a beard, not yet of Graingerlike magnitude but suffice enough to indicate he's maturing fast, rather like his piano playing which is beginning to take on a more contemporary edge. Pater Brown, his pate totally bereft of hair, gelled with his offspring on All the Things You Are and Things Ain't What They Used to be with Bradley on fire as ever.
Time for Gowland, on alto this week, to take centre stage as the house trio reassembled for Broadway - the 1940 number  - not to be confused with The Drifters' On Broadway, This tribute to the Great White Way swung.
The Chick Corea/Gary Burton number Crystal Silence wasn't a swinger but a meditative searching opus that was deservedly applauded vociferously.
Duncan Walker, on tenor this week, invited us to Take the A Train followed by a sensuous In a Sentimental Mood.
Lamb and Gowland, away from SSBB, teamed up for Bye Bye Blackbird. This was the real deal! Blistering trumpet, paint-stripping alto, pianistic perfection, rock solid basslines and kick-ass drumming.
Lamb went into ballad mode for Victor Young's Beautiful Love then Gowland joined him for Freddie Hubbard's great 'waltz' Up Jumped Spring.
As I left, Days of Wine and Roses wafted across the room - quite a night!
Photos.
Lance.
Pete Gilligan (pno); Paul Grainger (bs); Bradley Johnston (gtr); Dave McKeague (dms) + George Anyfantis (pno); Joel Brown (pno); Steve Brown (bs); Paul Gowland (alt); Duncan Walker (ten); Michael Lamb (tpt); Nick Kalanek (dms).

1 comment :

Lance said...

Apologies for not mentioning Nick Kalanek who sat in on drums towards the end. Great stuff, Nick!

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