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Bebop Spoken There

Tony Fisher: In the heyday of that scene [the1960s] there were about 120 musicians in London who did everything and of course, if you made a mistake you were never called again." - (Jazz Journal online, 19 September 2019).

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Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COFID- 19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Thursday, July 18, 2013

CD Review: PETE McGUINNESS – VOICE LIKE A HORN

Pete McGuinness – vocals, trombone; Jon Gordon – alto sax, flute; Bill Mobley- trumpet; Ted Kooshian - piano; Andy Eulau – bass; Scott Neumann - drums
(Review by Debra M.)
Pete McGuiness is an established jazz arranger, trombonist & vocalist, based in New York City. The first album to showcase his voice, this combination of all facets of his musicianship has resulted in the swinging scatfest ‘Voice Like A Horn’. The recording features a small ensemble of piano trio and horns, & McGuinness’s arrangements provide ample opportunity for improvisation for all the instrumentalists, of which his scatting is an integral part.
Variety is added by the horns, which are particularly effective in ‘Oh You Crazy Moon’, punctuating the vocal & solo sections. McGuiness’s honeyed tones are clearly reminiscent of Chet Baker & Mel Tormé, and his smooth voice, with innate swing and fluid scatting , particularly suits the high tempo numbers. The project comprises mainly jazz standards, an exception being trumpeter Bill Mobley’s be bop style ‘49th Street’. On this track, and also Dizzy Gillespie’s ‘Birks’ Works’, McGuiness’s vocal agility is extraordinary. Perhaps not surprisingly, the style is similar to his trombone solos , in particular in George & Ira Gershwin’s ‘Who Cares?’. However, good musicians know when less is more, and contrast is provided by his compelling, stripped down rendition of ‘Never Let Me Go’, which has the most emotional impact of all the tracks on the album. Sometimes just the words are enough.
Debra M.

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