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Bebop Spoken There

Ethan Iverson: "I asked Bertha [Hope] if she ever used the word "contrafact" to describe the process of writing new tunes over old changes, and she replied, "Of course not. The only people who used that word went to a university to learn about jazz."" - (Jazz Times March 2020).

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Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COFID- 19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Thursday, November 10, 2011

Convergence Quartet @ The Lit & Phil, Newcastle.

Taylor Ho Bynum (cornet), Alexander Hawkins (piano), Dom Lash (double bass) & Harris Eisenstadt (drums)
The Convergence Quartet first played Newcastle some four years ago. This return visit was, for some, an eagerly anticipated event. North Americans Taylor Ho Bynum (a disciple of Anthony Braxton) and Canadian drummer Harris Eisenstadt met up once more with Brits Alexander Hawkins (piano) and bassist Dom Lash.
Sheet music littered the Lit and Phil's music room, music stands taking the strain under reams of paper. Structured sections formed the basis from which improvisations developed. And what improvisations they were! Bynum, a masterful brass player, incorporated so many elements, so many influences in his playing; the free players - Bill Dixon, Don Cherry certainly, Miles, Dizzy, Clifford without question, then there was Louis and King Oliver. Harmon and plunger mutes were used to great effect. Crescent City slurs and growls gave way to Cool School Miles and on to today (the sound of Taylor Ho Bynum).
Pianist Hawkins, from a classical background, possesses flawless technique and he too gave a brilliant display. Twentieth century contemporary lyricism soon gave way to fierce bop lines of which Bud Powell would have been proud. The music was of the highest order, the playing sincere and impassioned.
Drummer Harris Eisenstadt, a master musician of quiet demeanour, listened intently to his compatriots on the stand, responding to and frequently initiating a change of direction as the music developed.
Double bassist Dom Lash worked as an equal partner in the quartet pulling it this way then that. All four swung mightily at times not least on a powerful blues to conclude a gig that will be recalled fondly in years to come by those fortunate to be present.
The concert was a Jazz North East presentation assisted by the good offices of the Literary and Philosophical Library. The next concert at the venue brings together two of the greats of the free jazz world. American saxophonist and pianist Charles Gayle will be in the company of Dutch percussion master Han Bennink on Friday 18th November (8:00 pm). It promises to be a great occasion.
Russell.

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