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Bebop Spoken There

Brian Carrick: "I contacted Max Jones of Melody Maker and offered to be his correspondent in the States, but I should have done what Ken Colyer had done, get a job on a ship and then jump ship in the States. So I didn't make it [to New Orleans] till 1973." - (Just Jazz May 1999)

Archive.

The Things They Say!

Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Rupert Burley (Dynamic Agency): "BSH just goes from strength to strength".

COVID-19

In the current climate we are doing our best to keep everyone up to date. All gigs, as we all know, are off.

However, good old YouTube has plenty to offer both old and new to help us survive whilst housebound. Plus now is a good time to stock up on your CDs.

Also, keep an eye out for live streaming sessions.

Alternatively, you could do as they do in Italy and sing from your balcony.

Today

As we all know there are no live gigs taking place in the immediate future. However, any links to jazz streaming that are deemed suitable - i.e. with a professional approach - will be considered for posting.

Saturday, October 29, 2011

Bill Wyman and the Rhythm Kings @ The Sage

Bill Wyman (bs/vcl); Albert Lee (gtr/keys/vcl); Terry Taylor (gtr/vcl); Georgie Fame (org)/vcl); Graham Broad (dms); Beverley Skeete (vcl); Frank Mead, Nick Payn (saxes/hca/vcl); Geraint Watkins (keys); Mary Wilson (vcl).
Bill Wyman may not play a lot of bass these days but he sure knows how to put a band together!
With a programme of about 30 numbers space precludes a listing - suffice to say we had jazz 'n' blues, rock 'n' roll, soul, funk and doowop and probably a few less definable moments such as Georgie Fame singing Just For a Thrill. A wonderful tune, worthy of Tin Pan Alley's finest tune-smiths, it was actually written in the 1920s by Hot Five pianist Lil Armstrong. Georgie stayed 'sweet' for an impressive duo with guest Mary Wilson on Stormy Weather. The former Supreme sang a few hits, had 3 changes of costume and had the audience Dancing in the Street (in the aisles to be precise).
Albert Lee, kicked ass on guitar as did Terry Taylor and both had vocal moments. Talking vocals, Mary Wilson didn't have the monopoly Beverley Skeete too scorched a few songs.
The two sax players strutted and blew all the riffs - Mead played blues harp a la Little Walter and threw in a  "Chuck Walk".
I could go on and on - it was a night to remember as the full Hall One would surely testify.
Lance.

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