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Bebop Spoken There

Wynton Marsalis: "We haven't had anything like this [The Late Late Show] in New York for over 20 years. " - (Ronnie Scott's Jazz Club , January/February 2020)

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Hudson Music: Lance's "Bebop Spoken Here" is one of the heaviest and most influential jazz blogs in the UK.

Today Wednesday January 29

Afternoon

Vieux Carré Jazzmen - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

Take it to the Bridge - The Globe, Railway Street, Newcastle NE4 7AD. 7:30pm. £1.00.

Blues/Soul/Funk etc.

Moonshine Sessions - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 8:30pm. Free.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Safe Sextet @ Hoochie Coochie

Don Forbes (tpt); Paul Gowland (alt); John Rowland (ten); Alan Law (pno); Paul Grainger (bs); Eric Stutt (dms).
The band did a storming set and they’ll have the film to prove it, as a documentary about jazz in Newcastle was being made, and the cameras were rolling as they played a tune called Suspended Disbelief. We were told the tune was based on suspended fourth chords. I’ve no idea what these creatures are, but the piece was great to listen to, full of brassy dissonance.
The set had begun with the brass, soon joined by the others, on Horace Silver’s Nutville (?), with solos from the brass and piano. Then came Sunny Rollins Alfie's Theme, (not the song Alfie, by Cilla Black,) but a wonderfully strong tune, with references to These Boots Were Made For Walking by the double bass. There followed a tune by Victor Feldman, who may have been the brother of Marty Feldman (remember him?), as the trumpeter announcing tunes pointed out quietly, throwing us deliberate red herrings! Other tunes included Abdul; which was not as eastern as the title suggests; a slinky blues in three four time called The Fat Man; dedicated to someone on the local jazz scene; Society Red (Dexter Gordon); and Moanin’, with an especially adventurous alto sax solo. The final tune which was demanded as an encore from an enthusiastic audience, was Softly as in a Morning Sunrise.
There were frequent solos, all great to listen to, so it would be unfair to single out anyone for special mention. The brass sometimes had a New Orleans feel, and also produced rich beautiful harmonies. I was intrigued and amused by the drummer’s ship’s bell, at least that’s what it sounded like to me. Yes, a band well worth seeing and hearing.
Photos.
Ann Alex

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