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Bebop Spoken There

Jackie Paris: "A singer's got to be able to tell a story. Frank Sinatra and Nat Cole are best at that; Mel Tormé too. I like to take a lyric that means something and sing it right to the person it was meant for." - (DownBeat October 11, 1962).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Monday September 16

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see above).

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, February 17, 2012

The Exchange Orchestra - Download review.

Eirik Svelar; Aubin Vanns - Guitars; Matt Anderson, Ben Lowman - tenors; Emlyn Vaughan - Bass; John Arnesen - Drums.
Formed in Autumn 2011 under the initiative of the guitarist Eirik Svela, The Exchange Orchestra (TEO) is an homage to the late Paul Motian's great sextet (the electric bebop band). With the unusual line up of two guitars, two tenor saxophones, bass and drums TEO resonates with a powerful sound capable of executing a broad range of textures. Anchored with a solid foundation in the jazz tradition TEO is driven by the present and seeks to fuse the sound of the individual players with a sense of purpose as a band.
Jazz legend and pianist Thelonious Monk is recognised for having been ahead of his time. With his unique style of playing and writing he was able to fuse the roots of jazz with the avant-garde back in the 1940's. TEO seeks to build on these elements in Monk's compositions and through them expose its own individual band sound. This is not a tribute, but a homage suited to an original like Monk; self-discovery through the intimate exploration of music.
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The above was sent to me by Eirik Svelar and in truth there is little to disagree with. Monk's music, in itself, always strikes me as a little quirky (in a nice way!) so any attempt to personalise Monk's music whilst at the same time paying tribute to another musical maverick - Paul Motian - is a journey fraught with danger.
However, these guys from Leeds - it's always Leeds! - make a decent fist of it. Personally, I'd have preferred tenor and alto rather than two tenors although their tones are sufficiently different to avoid it being an issue.
It's not a smooth sound but Monk's never was and the four tracks are very listenable.
Little Rootie Tootie has a section I'd describe as "Collective Improvisation" rather than "Free" and it works without jarring the senses.
The guitar solos are facile and totally in keeping.
It may be a work in progress but the Exchange Orchestra are getting there.
Judge for yourself - theexchangeorchestra.bandcamp.com.
Lance.

1 comment :

Ann Alex said...

Lance, I loved 'Little Rootie Tootie' but couldn't possibly explain why. Each line (Bar?) of the music sounds wonderfully unfinished, as if they've missed a note off every time, and it's really intriguing.It reminded me of Eric Satie's piano music (Avant Garde classical). He didn't even use bar lines at all.
Ann Alex

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance