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Bebop Spoken There

Jeremy Pelt: "In my experience, the hottest player on the scene is almost always the most annoying motherfucker on the scene because they know that they're hot." - (DownBeat June 2019).

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2019 Parliamentary Jazz Awards

The voting is open between now and May 31 to enable site visitors to nominate their choices in the various categories of this year's APPJAG awards which can be done here.
BSH was very proud to be nominated and to win the 2018 Media Award and hope we can have your support again this year.

Today Monday May 20

Afternoon

Jazz

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

?????

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, February 17, 2012

The Exchange Orchestra - Download review.

Eirik Svelar; Aubin Vanns - Guitars; Matt Anderson, Ben Lowman - tenors; Emlyn Vaughan - Bass; John Arnesen - Drums.
Formed in Autumn 2011 under the initiative of the guitarist Eirik Svela, The Exchange Orchestra (TEO) is an homage to the late Paul Motian's great sextet (the electric bebop band). With the unusual line up of two guitars, two tenor saxophones, bass and drums TEO resonates with a powerful sound capable of executing a broad range of textures. Anchored with a solid foundation in the jazz tradition TEO is driven by the present and seeks to fuse the sound of the individual players with a sense of purpose as a band.
Jazz legend and pianist Thelonious Monk is recognised for having been ahead of his time. With his unique style of playing and writing he was able to fuse the roots of jazz with the avant-garde back in the 1940's. TEO seeks to build on these elements in Monk's compositions and through them expose its own individual band sound. This is not a tribute, but a homage suited to an original like Monk; self-discovery through the intimate exploration of music.
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The above was sent to me by Eirik Svelar and in truth there is little to disagree with. Monk's music, in itself, always strikes me as a little quirky (in a nice way!) so any attempt to personalise Monk's music whilst at the same time paying tribute to another musical maverick - Paul Motian - is a journey fraught with danger.
However, these guys from Leeds - it's always Leeds! - make a decent fist of it. Personally, I'd have preferred tenor and alto rather than two tenors although their tones are sufficiently different to avoid it being an issue.
It's not a smooth sound but Monk's never was and the four tracks are very listenable.
Little Rootie Tootie has a section I'd describe as "Collective Improvisation" rather than "Free" and it works without jarring the senses.
The guitar solos are facile and totally in keeping.
It may be a work in progress but the Exchange Orchestra are getting there.
Judge for yourself - theexchangeorchestra.bandcamp.com.
Lance.

1 comment :

Ann Alex said...

Lance, I loved 'Little Rootie Tootie' but couldn't possibly explain why. Each line (Bar?) of the music sounds wonderfully unfinished, as if they've missed a note off every time, and it's really intriguing.It reminded me of Eric Satie's piano music (Avant Garde classical). He didn't even use bar lines at all.
Ann Alex

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