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Bebop Spoken There

Jimmy Vaughan: "I don't just want to turn out stuff because I'm supposed to. I'm not a plumber. I don't want it to be just a job" - (Downbeat, August 2019)

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Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Monday July 22

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (See above).

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Evening

?????.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Friday, March 13, 2009

Free Spirits, Corner House Hotel, Thursday 12 March. Report by Russell.

Lewis Watson (ten/sop), Neil Harland (bs/bs.gtr), Dharambir Singh (sitar), Bhupinder Singh Chaggar (tabla and electric percussion).

The function room of a suburban public house was the meeting place for Eastern & Western musical traditions in the form of Free Spirits. Following a triumphant concert performance at the recent London Jazz Festival local jazz fans and interestingly, non - jazz fans, were in attendance for this eagerly anticipated event. The evening began with sitar and tabla establishing the framework for the first of the ragas. The slow tempo encouraged Lewis Watson to enter the proceedings on tenor and ace bassman Neil Harland was right there setting down a funklike feel which he maintained throughout the evening. A series of ragas unfolded with all four musicians reacting to the subtle shifts in emphasis from one or other of the quartet. Bhupinder Singh Chaggar, at times displaying bewildering hand speed, encouraged numerous change of tempi within any one piece. His musical compatriots were quick to respond and at times there was thrilling interplay between two, three or indeed all four musicians.

The second set began with Singh Chaggar and Harland locked in an exchange of rhythmic ideas which, at its conclusion, drew much, fully deserved, applause. A Harland original, written in memory of percussionist Bruce Arthur, brought the quartet together once again. Dharambir Singh dazzled in his improvisation on a scale - Watson took up the challenge - and a flurry of notes went to and fro. The fusion of classical Indian music and jazz worked so well, that, at times, a coherent sound emerged rendering the labelling or categorisation of the music somewhat redundant. Free Spirits - four virtuosi. Free Spirits hope to play another concert in the north east later this year. Watch this space. (Sittar info.)

Russell.

Photos

2 comments :

Lance said...

I enjoyed it - reminded me in places of the Joe Harriott Indo-jazz fusions albeit with a more contemporary feel. The sitar had me fascinated with its individual fret tunings and unusual fret spacings. Do they play from some form of tablature?

Roly said...

I enjoyed this concert also. What a joyous marriage of art forms and also how nice to see people of different cultural background come together in mutual respect and friendship to make lovely music.
I found the following link for some info. on sitar and tabla.
http://www.soolaba.com/instr.htm
I'm looking forward to their next JNE gig in the autumn and would recommend anyone to go.
Unique and special!
Roly

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance