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Bebop Spoken There

Randy Brecker: "It's still a thrill for me today to stand out front of a big band as the soloist and hear all that sound going on behind you. It brings the best out of me" - (DownBeat June 2019).

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2019 Parliamentary Jazz Awards

The voting is open between now and May 31 to enable site visitors to nominate their choices in the various categories of this year's APPJAG awards which can be done here.
BSH was very proud to be nominated and to win the 2018 Media Award and hope we can have your support again this year.

Today Monday May 20

Afternoon

Jazz

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free.

Evening

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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Saturday, March 07, 2009

BBC Big Band - Sunderland Campus

Tony Fisher, Martin Shaw, Nigel Carter, Brian Rankine (tpts); Mark Nightingale, Pete North, Mike Feltham, Ashley Horton (tmbs); Howard McGill, Sammy Mayne, (altos): Paul Jones, Paul Booth, (tens); Jay Craig (bar); Graham Harvey (pno); Jeremy Brown (bs); Tom Gordon (dms); Barrie Forgie (ldr).
The annual visit to the Sunderland Festival by the BBC Big Band served to prove what we already knew - that the band, fronted by Barry Forgie, is arguably the best of its kind anywhere. With the A team players aboard how could it be anything else? Admittedly the repertoire has been tried and tested many times yet, nevertheless, manages to remain fresh. Martin Shaw has probably forgotten how long he's been playing "I Remember Clifford" yet the flugel feature still managed to tug at the emotions. Tony Fisher led the section with much power and his duet with Nigel Carter on the Ted Heath arrangement of "Stardust" brought back memories of hearing it done by Bert Ezzard and Bobby Pratt midway through the last century.
Mark Nightingale - as good a slide man as there is - arranged "The Flight of the Bumblebee" as a trombone solo and it certainly pushed those skills to the limit. Was I the only one in the hall who felt they could have been put to better use? Probably, and I do concede that it was well done.
No quibbles about the saxes; everything they blew was pure gold whether soloing or as a section.
Last night's alto star, Paul Jones, tonight played tenor as did Paul Booth. Both swung like crazy. Likewise the two altos - Howard McGill and Sammy Mayne - had a stirring battle on the opener, Buddy Rich's "The Rotten Kid".
Bari saxman Jay Craig's playing oozed sensuousness on Mulligan's "Black Nightgown", the theme from that wonderful film - "I Want To Live" (Sadly, in the film, Susan Hayward didn't get her wish although, as she was about to be strapped into the electric chair, one can understand her last request.)
As ever, out front, Barry Forgie scored high on charm, humour and much panache and, as a pre-cautionary measure, I must get the name of his tailor!
Yes, a splendid evening of foot-tapping fare. Well it would have been if the floor of the hall hadn't been coated with some sticky gunge which meant that us foot-tappers were almost a half a beat behind as our feet struggled to cope with whatever it was underfoot. Still that's one way to stop the audience walking out. As if! With the BBC Big Band walking out isn't an option!
Tomorrow - the Voice of the North Jazz Orchestra with Steve Waterman. Unmissable!
Lance

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