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Bebop Spoken There

Sting: "It was great. They [the River City Jazzmen] all wore blue suits. The band had been together for about twenty years, which was the same age as the suits." - (Melody Maker Sept. 22, 1979).

Archive

Daily: July 6 - October 27

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden - Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead Quays, South Shore Road, Gateshead NE8 3BA. Tel: 0191 478 1810. Screenings at intervals during the day. Part of Akomfrah's exhibition Ballasts of Memory. Exhibition (daily) July 6 - October 27. 10:00am-6:00pm. Free.

Today Monday October 21

Afternoon

Jazz

Precarity John Akomfrah’s film (2017, 46 mins) about Buddy Bolden (see centre column).

Jazz in the Afternoon - Cullercoats Crescent Club, 1 Hudleston, Cullercoats NE30 4QS. Tel: 0191 253 0242. 1:00pm. Free admission.

Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool - Tyneside Cinema, Pilgrim Street, Newcastle NE1 6QG. Tel: 0191 227 5500. 3:00pm/5:30pm. Screening of Stanley Nelson's documentary film (2019, cert. 15, 1hr 55mins).

Evening

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To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Lickety Split & Take it to the Bridge @ The Chillingham. October 19

Dave Weisser invited trombonist Eddie Bellis to bring in his new ensemble to play a few tunes in the welcoming environment of the weekly workshop session Take it to the Bridge at the Chillingham. As the eight piece band arrived in ones and twos Weisser's regular outfit warmed-up with tunes by Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock. Keyboards man Barrie Ascroft switched to bass guitar duties to accommodate Steve Whitfield, tenor man Dougie Fielder was in attendance as ever, Mark on guitar, drummer Paul Wight put in a long stint and Main Man Weisser blew lots of good flugel. The late set featured vocalist Stacey Swanson on Cry Me a River and Misty with Daniel Tyson offering some tasteful support on guitar, likewise Weisser on flugel.
Lickety Split is a new band assembled by the self-effacing Eddie Bellis to play tunes he and his band-mates have a liking for. What a good idea! Get this lot - Well You Needn't, Mamacita, I'm Beginning to See the Light (the band's signature tune according to Bellis), You Stepped Out of a Dream, Four, Another Three Putt, the list goes on. First class material, from swing to bop, played by a first class outfit. The rhythm section, some of them on loan from the Customs House Big Band, played it relaxed, Basie-style. Veteran pianist Bill Brittain, guitarist Roy Willis, the redoubtable Alan Rudd on electric bass for the occasion and the hard-working Paul Wight behind the kit provided the foundation for the frontline to trade one impeccable solo after another. John Hudson (tenor sax) and Alan Marshall (alto sax) crafted beautiful solos, Bellis too, yet trumpeter Kevin Eland topped the lot with some stratospheric playing in the small upstairs room of the Chilli. The highlight of the evening proved to be so good that on arriving home 'round midnight I took from the shelves the CD Blues and the Abstract Truth to listen once again to Stolen Moments
A couple of hours earlier Lickety Split had given Oliver Nelson's classic tune the most reverential, indeed sublime reading imaginable. Calls for an encore resulted in a round of solos on Horace Silver's Sister Sadie. A great gig from a great band. I can think of a number of venues around the north east who could do worse than book Lickety Split. You're next chance to hear the band is on Wednesday 26th October at the Sage. Six o'clock start, admission free. I for one can't wait.
Russell.

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Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

Submissions for review

Whilst we appreciate the many emails, texts, messages and other communications we receive requesting album/gig reviews on BSH, regrettably, we are unable to reply to all of them other than those we are able to answer with a positive response.
Similarly, CDs received by post will only be considered if accompanied by sufficient background material.
Finally, bear in mind that this is a jazz-based site when submitting your album.
Lance